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November 2004

News for the investigators, staff and Friends of

The Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies

LSI Lifeline Online November 2004 Issue 81

Editor, Karen Henry kahenry@ku.edu

Editorial Assistant, Jessica Black Jessica@ku.edu

The Life Span Institute at the University of Kansas

1052 Dole Human Development Center

1000 Sunnyside Avenue

Lawrence, KS 66045-7555 (785) 864-4295 TDD (785) 864-5051

Back issues of Lifeline

Development Update: Friends of the Life Span Institute as of December 1, 2004

We are pleased to announce that our Friends membership now stands at 40!

Ross and Mariana Beach, Charles Greenwood and Judy Carta, Gregorio Diaz, Steve Fawcett and Kathleen McCluskey-Fawcett, Vance and Marilyn Hall, Betty Hart, Jim and Lee Mclean, Fred and Virginia Merrill, Bob Mirman, Mabel Rice, Todd and Sheryl Risley, Richard and Ruth Schiefelbusch, Steve and Carolyn Schroeder, Joe and Rita Spradlin, John and Linda Stewart, III, Rud and Ann Turnbull, Gary Waldron and Carol Foster, Steve Warren and Eva Horn, Mike and Kathy Wehmeyer, Glen and Nancy White, Dave and Dee Yoder, Ed and Mary Ann Zamarripa

The Friends of the LSI is a group of supporters, current and former Institute leadership and others with a compelling interest in furthering the Institute’s research, development and teaching opportunities. Contact Steve Warren, 785-864-4295 or sfwarren@ku.edu, or Dale Slusser, 785 832 7458 or dslusser@kuedowment.org for more information on Friends of the LSI or other giving opportunities.

Calendar of local seminars by or of interest to LSI affiliates:http://www.lsi.ku.edu/lsi/internal/seminars/seminars.html

Archive of conference seminars by LSI affiliates: http://www.lsi.ku.edu/lsi/internal/seminars/conference_presentations.htm

Submit your presentations: Send your submissions - and related PowerPoints, etc. - to Jessica Black at jessica@ku.edu.

Contents

Mabel Rice recognized with ASHA highest honors

Mabel Rice elected fellow of AAAS

Rud Turnbull receives Arc’s highest honors; Ann Turnbull wins 2004 Arc Distinguished Research Award

Rud Turnbull awarded 2004 Budig Teaching Professorship in Special Education

Jacob Gordon to retire

Jane Wegner to direct innovative speech pathologist training grant

NIH Announces new PHS Application Forms and Instructions for New and Non-Competing Applications

Important Update regarding NIH’s policy regarding Applications that include Consortium/Contractual Facilities and Administrative Costs (IDC)

Life Span in the News

Glen White and Michael Fox are finding out that emergency and disaster planning is still inadequate for people with disabilities three years after calls for reform went out after 9/11 from the disability community. They discussed some early results of their Nobody Left Behind study in the November 29 Lawrence Journal World. White directs the Research and Training Center on Independent Living. Fox is the Center’s Research Director and chairs the department of Health Policy and Management at the Kansas University Medical Center.

Troy Zarcone’s invention, the Personal Data Recorder, was highlighted on the cover of the November 5 Oread (http://www.oread.ku.edu/Oread04/Nov5/showcase.html) and in the Lawrence Journal World http://www.ljworld.com/section/citynews/story/186719. The PDR allows data collection of events in the field, clinical or laboratory setting with an ergonomically designed data entry system which allows for recording data without looking away from the target events.. That information then can be downloaded to a computer for further analysis. For technical information and other products developed by the Biobehavioral Measurement Core, see http://mrddrc.ku.edu/bmc/Products.htm. Zarcone is the coordinator of the Core that serves the researchers associated with the LSI’s Mental Retardation and Development Disabilities Research Center.

Sara Sack’s significant contribution to the passage of the Assistive Technology Act of 2004 was detailed in the Neighbors column of the November 1 Parsons Sun. Sack, who, along with Chuck Spellman and others, developed one of the most comprehensive state assistive technology programs in the nation, testified several times before Congress on the critical need to continue federal funding to increase access to assistive technology for individuals with disabilities, particularly in underserved and rural areas. Sack co-directs the Assistive Technology for Kansans project under the auspices of the Life Span Institute in Parsons.

Joe Donnelly’s recommendations on managing weight in middle age appeared in Vim and Vigor magazine, a consumer health magazine that is customized for dozens of medical centers and thousands of readers across the country. Donnelly directs the LSI’s Center for Physical Activity and Weight Management Center.

Mabel Rice recognized with ASHA highest honors

Mabel Rice, Fred and Virginia Merrill Distinguished Professor of Advanced Studies, received the highest honors of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association at its 2004 Convention on November 18-20.

In granting the honor, Rice was described as “a scholar of the highest caliber whose career contributions to the discipline of child language have been of enormous significance.”

Rice is best known for her groundbreaking multidisciplinary research that bridges psychology, linguistics, and speech-language pathology to explore the understanding of specific language impairment (SLI) and to precisely characterize the morphosyntactic abilities of children with SLI, a condition affecting 7 percent of kindergarten-aged children.

Her collaboration with Kenneth Wexler of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology produced the most extensive longitudinal study of children's grammatical development and culminated in The Rice/Wexler Test of Early Grammatical Impairment-the first test to diagnose grammatical deficits in children with SLI.

Rice's current work, which links scholars from around the globe, investigates the genetic underpinnings of child language. She is also known for her important work examining, for example, the impact of television on children's vocabulary acquisition, the connection between language and cognition, and the role of language abilities in children's peer interactions.

Mabel Rice elected fellow of AAAS

Mabel Rice, Fred and Virginia Merrill Distinguished Professor of Advanced Studies, was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C.

The AAAS is the world's largest general scientific organization and publishes Science magazine. Since 1874, the AAAS has elected fellows whose “efforts on behalf of the advancement of science or its applications are scientifically or socially distinguished.”

Rice is a professor of speech-language-hearing, director of the Merrill Advanced Studies Center, the Center for Biobehavioral Neurosciences in Communcication Disorders and the Child Language Doctoral Program.

She was honored by the AAAS section of linguistics and language science for outstanding contributions to research on first-language acquisition by children with language impairments and for service to national professional organizations and early-education programs

Rice will be recognized at the annual meeting of the AAAS in February in Washington.

Rud Turnbull receives Arc’s highest honor; Ann Turnbull wins 2004 Arc Distinguished Research Award

Ann Turnbull and H.R. “Rud” Turnbull III, co-directors of the Beach Center on Disability, have won major national awards for their work to improve the quality of life for people with intellectual disabilities and their families.

The Arc of the United States presented its highest honor, the 2004 Franklin Smith Award to Rud Turnbull at its November 18-21 2004 convention.

Ann P. Turnbull was awarded with the 2004 Distinguished Research Award.

Both Turnbulls are professors of special education.

The Franklin Smith Award, named for a longtime Arc activist, recognizes national service to the field of developmental disabilities and is the highest honor given by the Arc.

The Distinguished Research Award, which comes with $1,000, recognizes an outstanding researcher whose work has had a significant impact on the prevention or amelioration of mental retardation.

Ann and Rud Turnbull co-founded the Beach Center on Disability and have served as its co-directors since 1988. They are nationally recognized for their research, policy development and advocacy for persons with disabilities and their families.

The Arc is the nation's largest volunteer-based organization devoted solely to issues concerning people with mental retardation and related developmental disabilities and their families.

Rud Turnbull awarded 2004 Budig Teaching Professorship in Special Education

H.R. “Rud” Turnbull III, co-director of the Beach Center on Disability, received the 2004 Gene A. Budig Teaching Professorship in Special Education at KU’s 2004 convocation. The honor is presented annually to a special education faculty member who demonstrates excellent teaching skills in the classroom and is based on nominations from students.

Each Budig award recipient receives an honorarium and presents a formal lecture during the academic year.

Jacob Gordon to retire

Jacob U. Gordon, Associate Professor of African and African-American Studies and director of the Center for Multicultural Leadership, which was associated with the Life Span Institute since 1991, will retire on December 31.

Gordon was instrumental in establishing African and African-American Studies at KU. He taught courses in black leadership for several years and developed the African-American Male Leadership Academy under the auspices of the Life Span Institute.

He explored the theoretical basis of black American leadership during his career, realizing that there was almost no research on the subject.

Gordon is also known for his work on public policy issues regarding substance abuse prevention and the criminal justice system.

Jane Wegner to direct innovative speech pathologist training grant

Jane Wegner, director of the Schiefelbusch Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic, will direct an innovative speech-language-hearing graduate clinical training program that will serve Lawrence students with communicative disorders, their families and teachers.

The $923,200 U.S. Department of Education grant, the Augmentative and Alternative Communication in the Schools (ACTS) project, will recruit 100 graduate students beginning in 2005.

ACTS trainees will earn M.A. degrees in speech-language pathology while helping Lawrence Public School students communicate better in the classroom and at home with techniques and devices called augmentative and alternative communication.

Augmentative and alternative communication (ACC) is a relatively new area of rehabilitation to develop or restore the ability to communicate to individuals with severe disorders including cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, autism, traumatic brain injury, stroke, or neuromuscular disorders such as multiple sclerosis and muscular dystrophy.

ACC systems range from specialized gestures to communication boards and books, sign language, and electronic communication devices.

KU’s Pardee Augmentative and Alternative Communication Laboratory, which was endowed by former client Russell Pardee in 2001, will help trainees learn how to fit ACC to their clients’ individual complex and often changing needs.

NIH Announces new PHS Application Forms and Instructions for New and Non-Competing Applications

Paul Diedrich, Associate Director for Project Development

The November 5, 2004 NIH Guide announced the availability of the revised PHS 398 and PHS 2590 application packets. The new instructions and forms will be accepted as of December 1, 2004, and must be used for applications submitted on or after May 1, 2005.

For new proposals, resubmissions and competing-continuations (renewals) the PHS 398 application packet has been updated “extensively with a focus on clarity and special emphasis on simplicity and plain language…The application package has been organized into three distinct, but integrally linked, parts”:

Part I: Instructions for Preparing the Application
Part II: Supplemental Instructions for Preparing the Human Subjects Section of the Research Plan
Part III: Policies, Assurances, Definitions and Other Information
An overview of these changes can be found at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-05-006.html

The actual application package can be found at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/phs398/phs398.html

For non-competing continuations (progress reports) the PHS 2590 application packet has also been updated including the SNAP (Streamlined Noncompeting Award Process) instructions.

An overview of these changes can be found at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-05-007.html

The actual application package can be found at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/2590/2590.htm

If you have any questions regarding the new application packages,
please contact either Paul Diedrich or Jessica Black.

We will try to find answers for you, as this will be a learning curve for all of us.

Important Update regarding NIH’s policy regarding Applications that include Consortium/Contractual Facilities and Administrative Costs (IDC)

Paul Diedrich, Associate Director for Project Development

In April 2004, NIH changed a long-standing policy that subcontractors indirect costs are considered part of the prime contractor’s direct costs. In their announcement NOT-OD-04-040, NIH states “Applications in response to those Program Announcements (PAs) and Requests for Applications (RFAs) that include a limitation on direct costs are to exclude from that limit the facilities and administrative (F&A) costs requested by consortium participants.”

In November 2004, NIH expanded this policy to include all proposals, As stated in the NIH Guide announcement “This Notice supersedes Notice NOT-OD-04-040 “Change in Direct Cost Limitations on Solicited Applications,” and broadens the scope of the policy change to apply to all applications involving consortium/contractual facilities and administrative (F&A) costs, regardless of amount of budget or budget format (e.g., modular and non-modular).

This change is effective for applications that have submission/receipt dates on or after December 1, 2004. This policy applies to all solicited and investigator-initiated applications. For solicited applications, this policy change now applies to all currently active announcements (Request for Applications and Program Announcements), regardless of the announcement issue date.” For a complete description on this change in policy, please go to: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-05-004.html

If you have any questions regarding this new policy, please contact Paul Diedrich.

Institute Activities

Appointments

Joan Houghton was promoted to Research Assistant Professor for Life Span Institute.

Joan Houghton received the 2004 Alice H. Hayden Outstanding Doctoral Student Award for "demonstrated potential leadership, teaching, scholarship, and service on behalf of people with disabilities," at the annual TASH Conference, Reno, NV.

Kate Saunders has been appointed by the Association for Behavior Analysis International as its delegate to the Federation of Behavioral, Psychological, and Cognitive Sciences. The Federation is a coalition of Science Organizations that represents the interests of researchers in all areas of psychology. Efforts are focused on legislative and regulatory advocacy, education, and the communication of information to scientists.

Kate Saunders has also been appointed as the Coordinator of Science Policy and Research Board for the Association for Behavior Analysis International.

Awards

Holly Storkel was named Associate Editor for Language, Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research.

Publications

Houghton, J., Cook, J.C., Goehl, K., & Poff, L. (in press). Collaboration achieves travel success (Project CATS): A case study as told by Alonso’s team. Deaf-Blind Perspectives (winter issue).

Reichard, A., Sacco, T., Turnbull, R., & Turnbull, A. (in press). Access to health care for individuals with developmental disabilities from minority backgrounds. Mental Retardation.

Sailor, W. (in press). Positive behavior supports. In S. W. Lee, & P. A. Lowe (Eds.), Encyclopedia of School Psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Storkel, H.L. (2004). Do children acquire dense neighborhoods? An investigation of similarity neighborhoods in lexical acquisition. Applied Psycholinguistics, 25, 201-221.

Storkel, H.L. (2004). The emerging lexicon of children with phonological delays: Phonotactic constraints and probability in acquisition. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 47, 1194-1212.

Stowe, M.J., Turnbull, H.R., & Sublet, C. (in press). The Supreme Court and disability policy: Discrimination in boardrooms, courtrooms, and bedrooms. Mental Retardation.

Stowe, M.J., Turnbull, H.R., & Umbarger, G.T. (in press). Connections among the core
concepts of health policy and the core concepts of disability policy. Journal of Disability Policy Studies.

Turnbull, A.P., Turnbull, H.R., Erwin, E., & Soodak, L. (2005). Families, Professionals, and Exceptionality: Positive Outcomes through Partnerships and Trust. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

Turnbull, A., Turnbull, R., Erwin, E., & Soodak, L. (Eds.). (in press). Families, Professionals, and Exceptionality: Positive Outcomes through Partnerships and Trust (5th ed.). Merrill Prentice Hall.

Turnbull, A., Turnbull, R., et al. (2004). Enhancing quality of life of families of children and youth with disabilities in the United States. In A.P. Turnbull, I. Brown, & H.R. Turnbull (Eds.), Family quality of life: An international perspective. Washington, DC: American Association on Mental Retardation (monograph series).

Turnbull, A.P., & Turnbull, H.R. (in press). Parent-professional relationships. In M.E. Snell & F. Brown (Eds.), Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

Turnbull, A.P., Turnbull, H.R., Shank, M., & Leal, D. (2002). Exceptional lives: Special education in today’s schools (3rd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall. (Translated into Chinese, 2004, and published in China by East China Normal University Press)

Turnbull, H.R. (in press). Medically assisted dying and cognitive disability: A policy analysis. Journal of Religion and Disability.

Umbarger, G.T., Stowe, M.J., & Turnbull, H.R. (in press). The core concepts of health policy affecting families who have children with disabilities. Journal of Disability Policy Studies.

Zuna, N., & Turnbull, R. (in press). A modest proposal: Jonathan Swift, John Lennon, and the education of children with disabilities. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities.

Posters

Houghton, J., & Bashinski, S. (2004). Special educators' perspectives about attributes for an intensified practicum approach for future educators of students with severe cognitive disabilities. Poster presented at the annual TASH Conference, Reno, Nevada.

Presentations

Cress, P., Sack, S., & Simmons, S. (2004, November). Assistive technology: Impact on users and a model for improving access. Presentation at the 2004 TASH Conference, Reno, NV.

Houghton, J. (2004). Best practice indicators of travel and familiarization IEP goals, objectives and/or benchmarks. Presented at Terre Haute: Indiana State University, Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Special Education.

Johns, C., Swenson, S., & Turnbull, R. (2004, May). Health care policy and the use of technology. Presented at the American Association on Mental Retardation, Philadelphia, PA.

McKerchar, T.L., Osterhaus, G.L., Vorontsova, E., Zarcone, T.J., & Fowler, S.C. (2004). Differential learning of lever pressing in inbred and outbred mice: Comparison of a one- and two-lever procedure [Abstract]. Society for Neuroscience, 1008.15.

Osterhaus, G.L., Fowler, S.C., Vorontsova, E., & Zarcone, T.J. (2004). Amphetamine-disrupted lever pressing in rats is restored by raclopride [Abstract]. Society for Neuroscience, 113.9.

Sailor, W. (2004, November). Beyond inclusion: The schoolwide applications model (SAM). Presentation at the 2004 TASH Conference, Reno, NV.

Sailor, W. (2004, November). Inclusive education: The schoolwide applications model. Presentation at the 2004 TASH Conference, Reno, NV.

Sailor, W. (2004, November). TASH legacy: A tribute to Norris Haring. Presentation at the 2004 TASH Conference, Reno, NV.

Storkel, H. L. (2004, November). The influence of form characteristics on word learning. With T. Brackenbury, S. Gray, P. Gupta, & K. McGregor in seminar entitled ‘Learning and using new words: Research to practice.’ Invited presentation at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, Philadelphia, PA.

Storkel, H.L., Armbruster, J., & Hogan, T.P. (2004, November). Effects of neighborhood density and phonotactic probability on word learning. Presentation at the 45th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Minneapolis, MN.

Stowe, M., & Turnbull, R. (2004, May). Trends in disability policy. Presented at the American Association on Mental Retardation, Philadelphia, PA.

Turnbull, A., Turnbull, R., & Wang, M. (2004, July). Family quality of life: Policy, research, and practice in the United States. Presented at Beijing Union University’s First International Forum on Special Education, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Turnbull, A., Turnbull, R., & Wang, M. (2004, July). Teacher preparation in special education in the United States. Presented at East China Normal University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China.

Turnbull, A.P., & Turnbull, H.R. (2004, March). Parent-professional relationships. Presented at Pace University, New York, NY.

Turnbull, R. (2004, July). Six principles of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act: Special education law in the United States. Presented at Beijing Union University’s First International Forum on Special Education, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Turnbull, R. (2004, July). Core concepts of disability policy: A comparison and contrast of American and Chinese policy. Presented at Beijing Union University’s First International Forum on Special Education, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

Turnbull, R. (2004, July). Public policy advocacy: Issues, techniques, and results in the United States. Presented at East China Normal University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China.

Turnbull, R. (2004, June). Medically assisted dying and cognitive disability: A policy framework. Presented at the National Association of Protection and Advocacy Systems, Washington, DC.

Turnbull, R. (2004, May). From these foothills: A tribute to J. Iverson Riddle, M.D., Director. Presented at Western Carolina Center, on the Renaming of the Center to be the J. Iverson Riddle Center, Morganton, NC.

Zarcone, T.J., McKerchar, T.L., Osterhaus, G.L., Vorontsova, E., & Fowler, S.C. (2004). Effects and after effects of amphetamine on reinforce lever pressing by C57BL/6J mice. Society for Neuroscience, 688.15.

Service

Houghton, J. (2004, September). Invited by OSEP to serve as a panel reviewer for research and innovation grants, Washington, DC.

Central Office News and Announcements

Project Development

Paul Diedrich, Associate Director for Project Development

Past Submissions not Previously Reported

1. Chris Smith submitted his second-year continuation “Technical Assistance in the Area of Early Childhood Mental Health Services to SEK-CAP on November 3, 2004.

2. Joseph Donnelly, Rik Washburn, Bryan Smith, Richard Saunders, Debra Sullivan and Matt Mayo resubmitted their two-year RO3, “Effective Strategies for Weight Loss in People with Mental Retardation” to NIDDK on November 15, 2004.

3. Todd Little, in collaboration with John Colombo, Charles Greenwood, Yolanda Jackson, Jerry Bailey, John Poggio and Don Deshler, submitted a new, five-year proposal “KU Interdisciplinary Center for Education Science to DE/IES on November 18, 2004.

4. Jane Atwater submitted a new, six-month proposal “Early Childhood Dataset for Rural Programs” to the University of Missouri – Columbia on November 19, 2004.

5. Joseph Donnelly and Bryan Smith submitted their fifth-year non-competing continuation “Prevention of Obesity by Alteration of Dietary Fat” to NIDCD on December 1, 2004.

New Awards (not previously funded) Information

1. Michael Wehmeyer received a new, thirteen month award “Evaluating the Efficacy of the Support Intensity Scale (SIS) to Predict Extraordinary Support Needs for Kansans with Developmental Disabilities” which began September 1, 2004.

2. Glen White received a new, one-year award “Developing an Action Plan to Improve the Quality and the Quantity of Data about Paralysis” from the KU Medical Center, PI, Michael Fox, (prime contractor to the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation) which began October 1, 2004.

3. Charles Greenwood and Jay Buzhardt received a new, two-year award “Monitoring and Reporting Intervention Results for Children with/without Disabilities Ages Birth to Three: Developing a National Web-based Support Technology (A Steppingstones Phase 1 Project) which began November 1, 2004.

Again, we continue to wait for contracts and /or awards on over a dozen additional new proposals, which we hope to report on over the next few months.

Comments and questions to: lifespan@ku.edu


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