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May / June 2005

News for the investigators, staff and associates of the Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies

Editor, Karen Henry kahenry@ku.edu
Editorial Assistant, Jessica Black Jessica@ku.edu

The Life Span Institute at the University of Kansas

1052 Dole Human Development Center

1000 Sunnyside Avenue

Lawrence, KS 66045-7555 (785) 864-4295 TDD (785) 864-5051

Back issues of Lifeline

Calendar of local seminars by and of interest to LSI affiliates and Friends: http://www.lsi.ku.edu/lsi/internal/seminars/seminars.html

Archive of conference seminars by LSI affiliates: http://www.lsi.ku.edu/lsi/internal/seminars/conference_presentations.htm

Submit your presentations: Send your submissions - and related PowerPoints, etc. - to Jessica Black at jessica@ku.edu.

Remember to Save the Date for the LSI 50th Anniversary Celebration September 29 and 30, 2006!

The Friends of the Life Span Institute, launched in 2004, is a group of supporters with a compelling interest in furthering the Institute’s research, development and teaching opportunities. The Friends annual membership for an individual or couple is $1000. The Friends serve as a sounding board for shaping the long-term goals of the Institute and help the Institute communicate Life Span’s mission to increase the circle of Friends.

The Friends of the Life Span Institute are Ross and Mariana Beach, Charles Greenwood and Judy Carta, Gregorio Diaz, Steve Fawcett and Kathleen McCluskey-Fawcett, Vance and Marilyn Hall, Betty Hart, Frances and Floyd Horowitz, Todd Little and Patricia Hawley, Jim and Lee Mclean, Fred and Virginia Merrill, Bob Mirman, Terry and Judi Paul, Mabel Rice, Todd and Cheryl Risley, Richard and Ruth Schiefelbusch, Steve and Carolyn Schroeder, Joe and Rita Spradlin, John and Linda Stewart, III, Rud and Ann Turnbull, John and Patty Turner, Gary Waldron and Carol Foster, Steve Warren and Eva Horn, Mike and Kathy Wehmeyer, Glen and Nancy White, Dave and Dee Yoder, Ed and Mary Ann Zamarripa.

Contact Steve Warren, 785-864-4295 or sfwarren@ku.edu, or Dale Slusser, 785 832 7458 or dslusser@kuendowment.org for more information on Friends of the Life Span Institute or other giving opportunities.

Contents

Susan Kemper wins $1.5 million grant to study effects of aging on language

Steve Warren elected President-elect Designate of APA Division of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities

Jonathan Pinkston assumes coordination of Biobehavioral Measurement Core

John Colombo tapped for Acting Chair Psychology Department

First endowed scholarship fund established for Beach Center graduate student

Center for Physical Activity and Weight Management to hold 7th annual Conference on the Prevention and Treatment Of Overweight and Obese Individuals

Work Group for Community Health and Development co-host State Prevention Summit

Holly Storkel invited presenter at NIDCD Advisory Council

Focus on Research: Increasing Access to Information Technology

Institute Activities: Honors, Presentations, Publications, Testimony Project Development – May/June 2005

Life Span in the News

A profile of a 6-year-old Austin Howell of Olathe, a participant in a study of adapting a communication strategy called Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching for children with deaf-blindness, was a prominent story on the front page of the Kansas City Star on Thursday, July 7 http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/living/education/higher_learning/12070872.htm. The study, co-directed by Life Span researchers Associate Research Professor Nancy Brady and Research Assistant Professor Susan Bashinksi with Project Coordinator Joan Houghton.

Nancy Brady was also interviewed for a June 3 front page Lawrence Journal World story on a trend popular among some parents to teach their infants sign language before they begin to talk. Brady said that sign language is most effective for infants 6 months to a year whose brains want to communicate what they want, but whose mouths aren’t developed enough for words. See http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2005/june/03/signbabies.

David Ekerdt, Gerontology Center Director, discussed the pros and cons of pushing the age to collect Social Security up to 69 in a June 27 Lawrence Journal-World article and a 6News segment. Ekerdt pointed out that retirement at age 65 came about because of Social Security. He said that if people continued to work they would collect fewer benefits and pay more taxes. On the other hand, he said, it is a problem since young people want the positions of older workers. See http://www.6newslawrence.com/news/2005/jun/26/lawmakers_want_boost_retirement_age_69/.

The American Public Health Association’s DisAbility Forum Section Newsletter (www.alpha.org/white) mentioned the public lectures Glen White, Director of the Research & Training Center for Independent Living (RTC/IL), gave in Lima, Peru, in 2004 and 2005. The presentations, on the prevention of the secondary conditions and sexuality of people with paralysis, were sponsored by the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation and held at the Ann Sullivan Center. Discovering that most Peruvians with paralysis are too poor to buy pressure cushions for their wheelchairs (in the U.S., around $400), White, and colleague Wendy Parent, KUCDD Assistant Director, are working on a project that would develop a model to employ people with disabilities to make cushions that would sell at about $10. More at described in last month’s Lifeline at: http://www.lsi.ku.edu/lsi/lifeline/April2005.htm#elcentro.

Dot Nary, RTC/IL Training Director, had a column in the June 20 RT Image on the problems women who use wheelchairs face in maintaining fitness. In a discussion on the lack of fitness options for people in wheelchairs, Nary described how her mammogram technician complained that women in wheelchairs who are overweight and can’t move their torsos are “problems.” Nary researches and promotes health and fitness for people with disabilities. See www.rt-image.com.

RTC/IL student employee, Zach Coble, Winfield junior, was selected for prestigious paid summer internship for students with disabilities. Coble is interning in the office of Sen. Ted Kennedy. The internship program is sponsored by the Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation and the American Association of People with Disabilities. Zach was the subject of a story July 5 Wichita Eagle story at http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/12055218.htm.

Susan Kemper wins $1.5 million grant to study effects of aging on language

Susan Kemper, Roy A. Roberts Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Senior Scientist at the Gerontology Center was granted $1.3 million by the National Institute on Aging to study how aging affects the ability to produce language over the next five years. Producing language – or speaking - takes more of our attention and working memory as we age. If we are dual-tasking – talking and walking, talking on a cell phone and driving–the implications of having less cognitive reserve are obvious.

Kemper’s study will use a pursuit-rotor tracking system developed by the Digital and Electrical Engineering Core of the Life Span Institute’s Center for Biobehavioral Neurosciences in Communication Disorders. Using a computer mouse, the research subjects will attempt to follow a rotor around a track on a computer screen while being given a variety of language producing tasks ranging from reciting the alphabet to counting backwards, reading sentences to answering thought-provoking questions.

The results of the experiments are obtained in terms of graphs of percentage accuracy, pointer to rotor distance and speech amplitude, all with respect to time in milliseconds.

Kemper hopes that this kind of sensitive, moment-by-moment analysis of speech production during dual tasking might be used as a tool to identify and track people in the very early stages of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias and provide a way to monitor the effects of drugs developed for these conditions. “Its very hard to tell if these new drugs for Alzheimer’s are having much of an effect,” she said. “Right now we have tests like counting backwards by seven. Maybe what you need is something more delicate, like rotor performance while counting backwards by seven.”

Steve Warren elected President-elect Designate of APA Division of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities

Steve Warren, Director of the Life Span Institute and the Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Center, was elected President-elect Designate of the American Psychological Association’s Division of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities (Division 33). He will immediately begin serving on the executive committee of Division 33 and I will serve this year ss President-elect designate, next year as President-elect, then as President the following year. Warren will succeed Professor Sara Sparrow of the Yale Child Study Center at the Yale University School of Medicine.

Division 33 was formed in 1973 as a home for psychologists committed to advancing psychology practice and research on mental retardation and developmental disabilities. The division has five special interest groups: behavior modification and technology, dual diagnosis, early intervention, aging and adult development, and transitioning into adulthood. The division, which has a traditionally strong focus on autism practice and research, among other areas, would like to increasingly be recognized as a hub for the psychology of autism research. More: http://www.apa.org/monitor/nov04/closer.html.

Jonathan Pinkston assumes coordination of Biobehavioral Measurement Core

Jonathan Pinkston has assumed the position of Coordinator of the MRDDRC’s Biobehavioral Measurement Core (BMC). He replaces Troy Zarcone who left earlier this year for a faculty position at the University of Rochester.

Pinkston recently graduated from the University of Florida with a Ph.D. in psychology. His primary research interests are in learning and motivation, specifically how learning situations may modulate the effects of drugs. In addition to conducting research, Jon is interested in the development and implementation of new behavioral measurement devices. It was this interest that first attracted him to the BMC.

Jon reports to and collaborates with Steve Fowler and Charles Greenwood, the Scientific Co-Directors of the BMC. Together they work to provide MRDDRC investigators with needed measurement solutions in a timely and inexpensive manner.

The BMC is a half-time position. The other half of Jon’s time is served as a post-doc with Steve Fowler. The research in Fowler’s lab, in part, is directed at the study of antipsychotic drugs. Antipsychotic drugs are widely used therapeutically in developmentally disabled populations, but when used repeatedly they can result in the development of movement disorders. This research, funded by NIMH, is aimed at the preclinical identification of drugs with a higher risk of unwanted motor effects.

If you would like to know more about the BMC core and its services, or would just like to say hello, you may contact Jon at any of the following:

Email: pinkston@ku.edu
Office (5037 Malott Hall): 785-864-5720

The BMC web site, which lists services and projects is at: http://www.mrddrc.ku.edu/bmc/.

John Colombo tapped for Acting Chair Psychology Department

John Colombo, LSI Associate Director for Cognitive Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology, was tapped to step up as Acting Chair for his department. Colombo’s appointment is one of string of reassignments resulting from the resignation of Kim Wilcox, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Colombo will be on a “sabbatical” from his Life Span responsibilities except for coordination of the LSI’s upcoming 2005/06 Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquia.

First endowed scholarship fund established for Beach Center graduate student

Mary Margaret Simpson

A family with close ties to the University of Kansas and personal experience with disability has established a scholarship fund to assist graduate students at the Beach Center on Disability Six members of the Borchardt family have donated cash and securities valued at $200,000 to the Kansas University Endowment Association to endow a new scholarship fund for graduate study at the Beach Center. The donors are Julie and Scott Borchardt of Walpole, MA, Kelly Elrod of Richland, MI, Paul Borchardt of Lawrence, KS, and their parents, Ronald and Pamela Borchardt, also of Lawrence, KS.

Income from the fund, which will be called the Borchardt Family Scholarship for Beach Center Graduate Student Study in the Field of Mental Retardation and Community Inclusion, will assist graduate students who are working with senior faculty at the Beach Center and enrolled in the Department of Special Education in the KU School of Education.

The Beach Center offers sponsored research and training opportunities to more than 20 doctoral students a year. Special education graduate students typically focus on such areas as access to the general curriculum, family quality of life, positive behavior support, self-determination, technology use by persons with cognitive disabilities, and public policy related to these and other issues.

According to Beach Center Co-Director Rud Turnbull, the Borchardt Family Scholarship fund will make it possible for one or more doctoral students to pursue research and training to advance the rights and abilities of individuals with mental retardation so they can participate as fully as possible in their communities.

“Once again, the experience of disability has created a community of concern, interest, and commitment,” Turnbull said. “The Borchardt family gift ensures that students yet unborn will have opportunities to study at the Beach Center and, like those here now, prepare themselves to lead. In the best of KU traditions, the Borchardt family aligns itself with the future.”

Two of the donors – Julie and Scott Borchardt – say the motivation behind the family’s gift was their belief in the importance of the work of the Beach Center. They are the parents of two children, including a daughter who has Down syndrome. According to Julie Borchardt, “Many people in special education and related services have impacted our daughter’s life and thus our lives. The Beach Center has the opportunity to make a real impact on future student’s lives through its Ph.D. students.”

“A lot of positive strides have been made in the field of special education, incredible changes over the past 30 years,” she said. “Many more positive changes are likely to be made in the coming years.”

The Borchardt family has a strong connection to KU. Ron Borchardt earned his Ph.D. from KU in 1970 and is the Solon E. Summerfield Distinguished Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Julie and Scott Borchardt, Kelly Elrod, and Paul Borchardt are all KU graduates.

The Borchardt Family Scholarship is the first endowed scholarship fund at KU to specifically benefit the Beach Center. The Beach Center is also endowed by major gifts from Ross and Marianna Beach of Lawrence and Hays, KS. Private support also comes from the family of the late Betsy Santelli, one of the original members of the Beach Center staff; and by Beach Center co-founders Rud and Ann Turnbull and the Turnbull family.

Center for Physical Activity and Weight Management to hold 7th annual Conference on the Prevention and Treatment Of Overweight and Obese Individuals

The LSI’s Center for Physical Activity and Weight Management will hold its Seventh Annual Conference on the Prevention and Treatment Of Overweight and Obese Individuals. The 2005 focus, children, women, minorities, community wide approaches and the metabolic syndrome, is sponsored in part by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Public Health and Science, Region VII, and the United Methodist Health Ministry Fund.

The two-day conference will be held September 8-10, 2005 at the Marriott Hotel in Downtown Kansas City beginning Thursday afternoon and concluding Saturday at noon. Thursday afternoon is dedicated to issues of overweight and obesity in children, adolescents and women. Friday morning will address the metabolic syndrome and Friday afternoon will focus on community level interventions to promote physical activity and nutrition. Saturday morning will be devoted to the prevention and treatment of obesity in minorities and individuals with disabilities. For more information: http://www.ebl.ku.edu/conference/conf2005/conference_2005.htm.

Work Group for Community Health and Development co-host State Prevention Summit

Vicki Collie-Akers, MPH, Stephen Fawcett, Ph.D., Jerry Schultz, Ph.D., and Jomella Thompson, MUP, in collaboration with Addiction and Prevention Services of SRS and the Kansas Family Partnership, organized and hosted the Our Community of Learning and Doing Summit on June 27-28 in Topeka. The summit reviewed 13 locally developed case studies of prevention efforts and used them to construct the current state of prevention in Kansas. The work of thirteen Regional Prevention Centers and coalitions was recognized by acting SRS Secretary Gary Daniels in a ceremony held during the first day of the summit. Additionally, the KU Work Group team developed Case Study Briefs, which documented the case studies. The Work Group and Greenbush Research Services also provided an overview of the current status of prevention outcomes for the state of Kansas.

Holly Storkel invited presenter at NIDCD Advisory Council

LSI Researcher Holly Storkel, Assistant Professor, Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences & Disorders, was one of two junior investigators invited to present at the May 20 Advisory Council meeting of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders as part of a new investigators forum.

Strokel is currently studying understanding how typically developing children learn words so rapidly and why children with language impairments learn words so slowly. The next issue of the Lifeline’s Focus on Research will feature Storkel’s work.

Focus on Research

Introduction

This month we look at the work of Pamela Cress, Parsons LSI research associate, in assisting with the implementation of provisions of the American with Disabilities Act and related policy to make information technology like websites accessible to people with disabilities. The inventor of the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee, intended the Web to revolutionize access to information and communication for everyone. "The power of the Web is in its universality. Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect."

Blind and visually impaired users, for example, can interface with web pages through software that reads web pages. However, this became more difficult as commercial interests began to develop sophisticated web design software and proprietary web standards that complicated access for many users with and without disabilities.

At the same time, more and more services, commerce and communication began to be conducted through websites. In response, The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) emerged. The W3C, an international consortium that works with the public to develop web standards, has among its goals to develop standards that promote accessibility for people with a range of disabilities through its Web Accessibility Initiative.

The Federal and many state governments, including Kansas, have adopted guidelines based on these standards to which government agency websites are increasingly required to follow. Supporting the adoption of these standards more widely requires the deep and broad understanding of and connection to the disability, government and technical web development communities – a rare knowledge base that has earned Pam Cress, the coordination of not only Kansas, but the entire Great Plains ADA region.

Increasing Access to Information Technology: Subcontract with the Great Plains ADA & IT Center, University of Missouri

Pamela Cress, Research Associate, The Life Span Institute at Parsons

Since 2001 the LSI at Parsons has subcontracted with the Great Plains ADA & IT (Americans with Disabilities Act &Accessible Information Technology Center) to increase access to information technology (IT) for persons with disabilities. The National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research funds a network of 10 ADA and IT Centers, formerly called Disability and Business Technical Assistance Centers (DBTACs). The Great Plains region consists of the states of Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa.

For the first three years of this project the efforts of the project staff were focused in Kansas, but in October 2004, the Parsons staff assumed the coordination of IT activities for the entire region.

Project staff provide information, referral, training, and technical assistance to policy makers, businesses, educators, and disability advocates with the goal of making all information technology accessible to individuals with disabilities. Project staff have played a key role in developing and implementing a policy requiring that Kansas state agency websites meet accessibility standards, and continue to serve on the State of Kansas Web Accessibility Committee.

Staff have also worked as part of a national effort to increase the accessibility of information technology in education, including K-12 and post-secondary education settings. The project has provided considerable training to groups involved with educational technology. One of the current goals of the ADA & IT Center network is to enhance the accessibility of community college websites. In an effort the reach this goal, the KUCDD has sponsored two webcasts in 2005 to train community college web developers in accessibility awareness and techniques. The webcasts have reached over 200 trainees from 35 states and two other countries.

Project staff also play a major role at the National ADA Symposium and Expo, a conference supported by the entire network of ADA & IT Centers. This event, held annually in the Kansas City area, brings together architects, attorneys, business leaders, city and county officials, disability advocates, educators, and service providers to hear presenters that include representatives of the federal agencies that oversee disability rights laws, including the Department of Justice, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Department of Education, the Department of Labor, and the U.S. Access Board

Institute Activities

Honors

The KU School of Education presented its Making a Difference Award to Ann and Rud Turnbull at the School’s annual banquet on May 20. The award is presented annually to faculty for trail-blazing, visionary work that benefits students, the School of Education, and the fields of education and human services. Rud Turnbull also was the commencement speaker for the School of Education’s graduation ceremonies on May 21.

Sara Sack was honored April 6, 2005 with the Soroptimist International of Parsons "Making a Difference for Women" Award. Sack was chosen for the many contributions she had made to helping others. She oversees $14 million worth of federal grants, which focus on individuals across the life span that need assistive technology. Additionally, she has collaborated with Kansas State University to create a project to help farmers and their family members continue their roles after an injury or a chronic health condition. Because of Sack’s success with the Kansas Equipment Exchange program implemented two years ago with her colleagues, the assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Education has selected the project to be considered as a model for a national program.

Kathleen Olson and the Kansans Mobilizing for Workforce Change have been selected as a finalist for the Moving Mountains Award from the Institute on Community Integration. The actual awards will be given in winter 2006 at the Reinventing Quality conference that is sponsored by the Research and Training Center on Community Living and the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services.

Martha Hodgesmith has been elected to the Unclassified Senate at KU. She will be a representative of the Research sector. Her term in office is one year (July 1, 2005-June 30, 2006).

Publications

DeLeon, I. G., Williams, D. C., Gregory, M. K., & Hagopian, L. P. (in press). Unexamined potential side effects of noncontingent reinforcement. European Journal of Behavior Analysis.

Doughty, A. H., Cirino, S., Mayfield, K. H., da Silva, S. P., Okouchi, H., & Lattal, K. A. (2005). Effects of behavioral history on resistance to change. The Psychological Record, 55(2), 315-330.

Doughty, A. H., Doughty, S. S., O'Donnell, J., Saunders, K. J., & Williams, D. C. (in press). Stimulus control of punishment effects: Determining the controlling variables. Mexican Journal of Behavior Analysis.

Doughty, A. H., Reed, P., & Latal, K. A. (2004). Differential reinstatement predicted by pre-extinction response rate. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 11, 1118-1123.

Doughty, A. H., Williams, D. C., & Saunders, K. J. (2005). Performance under verbal and nonverbal transitive-inference procedures in persons with mental retardation [Abstract]. Proceedings of the 38th Annual Gatlinburg Conference on Research & Theory in Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities, 74.

Freeman, R., Smith, C., Zarcone, J., Kimbrough, P., Tieghi-Benet, M., Wickham, D., Reese, M., & Hine, K. (2005). Building a statewide plan for embedding positive behavior support in human service organizations. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 7(2), 109-119.

Lance, G.D., (2005). Reflections on Inclusion: Integrating the Disabled Self. Review of Disability Studies. 1(3), 9-13.

Saunders, R. R., McEntee, J. E., & Saunders, M. D. (2005). Interaction of reinforcement schedules, a behavioral prosthesis, and work-related behavior in adults with mental retardation. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 38, 163-176.

Saunders, R. R., & Saunders, M. D. (2005). In search of contingency learning: Something old, something new, something borrowed . . . . Behavioral Development Bulletin, 1, 23-30.

Presentations

Bejarano, R., & Williams, D. C. (2005, May). Effect of response-timeout contingencies under controlled probability of timeout presentations. Poster presented at the Association for Behavior Analysis 31st Annual Convention, Chicago, IL. Abstract retrieved June 7, 2005, from http://www.abainternational.org/convention/program/events//86.htm

Cress, P. J. (2005, May). Web resources for accessible information technology. Presented to the National Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Symposium, Overland Park, KS.

Doughty, A. H., da Silva, S. P., & Lattal, K. A. (2005, May). Differential resurgence and response elimination. Poster presented at the Association for Behavior Analysis 31st Annual Convention, Chicago, IL. Abstract retrieved June 7, 2005, from http://www.abainternational.org/convention/program/events//403.htm.

Doughty, A. H., Williams, D. C., & Perone, M. (2005, May). Experimenter-imposed delays attenuate disruptive effects of negative-incentive shifts in humans. In C. Galuska (Chair) & G. J. Madden (Discussant), Extending the effects of negative incentive shifts: Pausing in pigeons, primates, and people. Symposium conducted at the Association for Behavior Analysis 31st Annual Convention, Chicago, IL. Abstract retrieved June 7, 2005, from http://www.abainternational.org/convention/program/events//443.htm.

Estep, M., Barlow, S.M., Stumm, S., Fees, M., Finan, D., Seibel, L. Poore, M., Cannon, S. (2005). Non-nutritive Suck Burst Parametrics in Preterm Infants. Presented at the Society for Pediatric Research, 2141, Washington, D.C.

Funkhouser, M., Calhoun, G., & Simmons, S. (2005, April). Going to work: Personal and employer work incentives for accessing assistive technology. Presented at the 5th Annual KansTrans Conference, Kansas State Department of Education, Wichita, KS.

Kemper, S., & McDowd, J. (2005, May). Dimensions of Cognitive Aging: Decomposing Verbal Fluency. Presented at the International Conference on the Future of Cognitive Aging, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA.

Kessler, J., & Simmons, S. (2005, April). Going to college or vocational school: How to access AT and other supports during transition. Presented at the 5th Annual KansTrans Conference, Kansas State Department of Education, Wichita, KS.

O'Donnell, J., Doughty, A. H., Doughty, S. S., Saunders, K. J., & Williams, D. C. (2005, May). Stimulus control and punishment: A critical review of the literature. In A. H. Doughty (Chair) & J. E. Spradlin (Discussant), Issues in aversive control: Spanning the basic-to-applied continuum. Symposium conducted at the Association for Behavior Analysis 31st Annual Convention, Chicago, IL. Abstract retrieved June 7, 2005, from http://www.abainternational.org/convention/program/events//422.htm.

O’Donnell, J., Doughty, A. H., Doughty, S. S., Saunders, K. J., & Williams, D. C. Stimulus control and punishment: A critical review of the literature. Paper presented at the Association for Behavior Analysis, Chicago, IL.

Olson, K. M., & Black Moore, P. (2005, April). Autism and co-existing disorders: An introduction. Presented at Sharing Our Best Conference, Beatrice, NE.

Olson, K. M., Hermreck, D., & Black Moore, P. (2005, April). Three effective strategies to improve recruitment and retention of direct support professionals. Presented at Sharing Our Best Conference, Beatrice, NE.

Sailor, W. (2005, June). Schoolwide Applications Model. Presented at the Arizona TASH Inclusion Conference, Flagstaff, Arizona.

Saunders, K. (2005, February). NIH funding opportunities for students, postdocs, and new investigators. Invited presentation at federal-funding workshop held by the Association for Behavior Analysis, Chicago, IL.

Saunders, K. J. (2005, March). Evidence-based practice in establishing literacy in individuals with intellectual disabilities. Coordinator/Chair of session at The Gatlinburg Conference on Research & Theory in Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities, Annapolis, MD.

Seibel, L., Barlow, S.M., Vantipalli, R., Finan, D., Urish, M., Carlson, J. (2005). Spectral Dynamics of Non-Nutritive Suck in Preterm Infants. Presented at the Society for Pediatric Research, 2139, Washington, D.C.

Smith, C. (2005, February). Outcomes and integrated service delivery in Kansas: Planning for success and measuring it. Presentation to Kansas Integrated Outcomes Project statewide conference in Wichita, Kansas.

Smith, C. (2005, February). Outcomes and integrated service delivery in Kansas: Planning for success and measuring it. Presentation to Kansas Integrated Outcomes Project regional symposium in Wichita, Kansas.

Smith, C. (2005, February). Outcomes and integrated service delivery in Kansas: Planning for success and measuring it. Presentation to Kansas Integrated Outcomes Project regional symposium in Salina, Kansas.

Smith, C. (2005, March). Outcomes and integrated service delivery in Kansas: Planning for success and measuring it. Presentation to Kansas Integrated Outcomes Project regional symposium in Topeka, Kansas.

Stewart, K. L., Suchowierska, M., & Saunders, K. J. (2005, May). Developing prerequisites for reading and spelling in adults with mental retardation. In M. Hübner (Chair) & D. de Souza (Discussant), Minimal verbal units control in reading: What we know so far. Symposium conducted at the Association for Behavior Analysis. Abstract retrieved June 7, 2005, from http://www.abainternational.org/convention/program/events//361.htm.

Stumm, S., Barlow, S.M., Vantipalli, R. Finan, D., Estep, M., Seibel, L., Urish, M., & Fees, M. (2005). Amplitude/Burst Dynamics of the Non-Nutritive Suck in Preterm Infants. Society for Pediatric Research, 2632, Washington, D.C.

Williams, D. C., Doughty, A. H., Saunders, K. J., & Perone, M. (2005, May). Local determinates of FR pause duration in multiple schedules. Poster presented at the Association for Behavior Analysis 31st Annual Convention, Chicago, IL. Abstract retrieved June 7, 2005, from http://www.abainternational.org/convention/program/events//86.htm.

Training

Houghton, J. (2005). Indiana State Department of Education, Special Education with Indiana Deafblind Services Project, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN. Teachers in Hard Hats: (Module 1) Introduction to Learners with Deafblindness [Online]. http://web.indstate.edu/soe/blumberg/dbtrainingmod.html

On April 28th, Jerry Schultz, Ph.D., Work Group for Community Health and Development conducted a one-day training on Building Healthy Communities for local health improvement coalitions in Central Arkansas. The workshop was sponsored by the Central Hometown Health Improvement Office of the State of Arkansas Health Department.

Central Office News and Announcements

Project Development

Paul Diedrich

Past Submissions not Previously Reported

1. Bryan Smith submitted a new, one-year proposal “Kansas Get Moving! 3-A—Day Dairy Education” to the Midwest Dairy Council on May 13, 2005.

2. Stephen Fawcett, Jerry Schultz and Beverly Graham submitted a new, five-year proposal “Increasing Access and Appropriate Utilization of Health Services for the Uninsured” to the DHHS on May 17, 2005.

3. Stephen Fawcett, Jerry Schultz and Beverly Graham submitted a new, five-year proposal “Reducing Underage Drinking through a Community Intervention in Two Kansas Communities” to the DHHS on May 17, 2005.

4. Steve Warren and Judy Carta submitted a one-year, supplement for “Preventing Child Neglect in High-Risk Mothers” to Notre Dame University (prime contractor to NICHD) on May 25, 2005.

5. Chris Smith submitted his third year continuation “Kids Crew: The Independence Community Learning Center” to USD 446 on May 27, 2005.

6. Hugh Catts submitted his ninth-year progress report “Relationship Between Language and Reading Abilities” via the University of Iowa (prime contractor, Bruce Tomblin PI, “Collaboration on Specific Language Impairment”) to NIDCD on June 1, 2005.

7. Mabel Rice submitted her ninth-year progress report “Diagnosis of Developmental Language Impairment” via the University of Iowa (prime contractor, Bruce Tomblin PI, “Collaboration on Specific Language Impairment”) to NIDCD on June 1, 2005.

8. Eva Horn and Susan Palmer submitted their third-year continuation “Children’s School Success” to Indiana University (prime contractor to NICHD) on June 1, 2005.

9. Holly Storkel submitted a new, five-year proposal “Word Learning in Children” Normal Development and Language Impairment” to NIDCD on June 1, 2005.

10. Chris Smith submitted a new, fourteen-month proposal “Integrated Outcomes Technical Assistance” to the Kansas Head Start on June 3, 2005.

11. Sara Sack and Charles Spellman submitted her thirteenth-year, grant performance report “Assistive Technology for Kansans Project (ATKP)” on June 8, 2005.

12. Sara Sack submitted her third-year continuation “Equipment Exchange” Increasing Access to Durable Medical Equipment” to the Kansas Department of SRS on June 10, 2005.

13. Mabel Rice submitted a new, eight month proposal “Merrill Conference Sponsorship – Phoenix” to NIH on June 14, 2005.

14. Joseph Donnelly, Bryan Smith, Richard Washburn, and J. Leone Greene collaborating with Cheryl Gibson, Matthew Mayo and Debra Sullivan at the KU Medical Center, submitted a new, five-year proposal “Prevention of Obesity in YMCA After School Programs” to NIDDK on June 15, 2005.

15. Todd Little submitted a new, one-year proposal “TEVA Service Agreement” to the TEVA Neuroscience, INC. on June 16, 2005.

16. Sara Sack submitted her eighth-year continuation “Assistive Technology Project” to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment on June 17, 2005.

17. Amy McCart resubmitted a three-year, subcontract proposal “Comprehensive School Reform: The Positive Behavior Support and Math Proficiency Model” via the Whittier Elementary School (prime contractor to the Kansas Department of Education on June 17, 2005.

18. Wayne Sailor and Sandra Padmanabhan submitted a new, three-year proposal “Prime Time: An Abstinence-Training Program for the Urban Community by the Urban Community” to HHS/ACF on June 20, 2005.

19. Dave Lindeman submitted his eighth-year continuation “Southeast Kansas Respite Care Services (SEKRS)” to the Parsons State Hospital and Training Center on June 22, 2005.

20. Dave Lindeman submitted his eighth-year continuation “Dual Diagnosis of Persons with Disabilities” to the Parsons State Hospital and Training Center on June 22, 2005.

21. Glen White submitted his second-year continuation “Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Health and Wellness for Persons with Long Term Disabilities” to the Oregon Health and Science University (prime contractor to DE/OSERS/NIDRR) on June 24, 2005.

22. Dave Lindeman submitted his eighth-year continuation “Kansas Inservice Training System: Infant and Toddler Component” to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment on June 24, 2005.

23. Dave Lindeman submitted a new, nineteen-month proposal “Geary County Infant/Toddler Training” to Geary County Infant Toddler Services on June 27, 2005.

24. Dave Lindeman submitted his continuation “Active Treatment Training Program” funded by the Parsons State Hospital and the Kansas Neurological Institute on June 30, 2005.

25. Dave Lindeman submitted his fifth-year continuation “SEK-CAP: Program Evaluation Project” to the Southeast Kansas Community Action Program (SEK-CAP) on June 30, 2005.

26. Dave Lindeman submitted his continuation “Child Care Focus: Resource and Referral Center” to the Kansas Association of Child Care Resource and Referral on June 30, 2005.

27. Dave Lindeman submitted his continuation “Child Care Focus: Infant-Toddler Initiative Project” to the Kansas Association of Child Care Resource and Referral on June 30, 2005.

28. Mabel Rice is submitted her fourth-year, non-competing continuation for the P30 Center “Biobehavioral Sciences in Communication Disorders” to NIDCD on July 1, 2005.

29. Todd Little (faculty mentor) and Noel Card submitted their second-year continuation “Growth of Forms and Functions of Aggression in Youth” to NIMH on July 1, 2005.

30. Susan Kemper, in collaboration with Joan McDowd at KU Medical Center, submitted their second-year continuation “Tracking Older Adults’ Eye Movement While Reading” to NIA on July 1, 2005.

31. David Ekerdt resubmitted his three-year proposal “Accomplishing Household Disbandment in Later Life” to NIA on July 1, 2005.

32. Mabel Rice resubmitted her five-year subcontract proposal “Autism: Social and Communication Predictors in Siblings” to the Kennedy Krieger Institute (prime contractor to NIIMH) on July 1, 2005.

33. Michael Wehmeyer submitted his third-year, grant performance report “The Impact of Interventions on Self-Determination and Adult Outcomes” to DE/OSERS/NIDRR on July 1, 2005.

34. Judith Carta and Kathy Thiemann submitted a new, three-year proposal “Partnership to Develop and Enhance a Social Curriculum for Head Start Programs Serving American Indian Children” to HHS/ACF on July 1, 2005.

35. Chris Smith, David Lindeman and Todd Little submitted a new, three-year proposal “Head Start University Partnership: Curriculum Evaluation and Enhancement” to HHS/ACF on July 1, 2005.

Upcoming Submissions

1. Michael Wehmeyer and Sean Smith will submit their fifth-year, grant performance report “Mental Retardation and Technology Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project” to DE/OSERS/OSEP on July 5, 2005.

2. Kathleen Olson will submit a new, three-year subcontract proposal “Building Careers for Direct Support Professional” to the Labette Community College (prime contractor to the Department of Labor) on July 5, 2005.

3. Glen White will submit a new, five-year subcontract proposal “National Center for Accessible Research” to Portland State University (prime contractor to DE/OSERS/NIDRR on July 5, 2005.

4. Judith Carta, Dale Walker and Kathleen Baggett will submit their second-year continuation” partnerships to Develop Meaningful Outcome Measures for Early Head Start Children and Families on July 8, 2005.

5. Katherine Froehlich-Grobe will submit a new, five-year (transfer from KU Medical Center) proposal “A Randomized Exercise Trial for Wheelchair Users” to NICHD on July 8, 2005.

6. Jerry Schultz will submit his fourth-year continuation “Community Monitoring Documentation System” to the Kansas Department SRS on July 11, 2005.

New Awards (not previously funded) Information

1. Glen White received a new, five-year subcontract award “Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Health and Wellness for Persons with Long Term Disabilities” from the Oregon Health and Science University (prime contractor to DE/OSERS/NIDRR) which began October 1, 2004.

2. Judith Carta received a new, one-year award “CWC – Outcomes and Tracking Proposal” from Children’s Campus of Wyandotte County that began March 1, 2005.

3. Chris Smith received a new, fourteen-month award “Integrated Outcomes Technical Assistance” from the Kansas Head Start which began May 1, 2005.

4. Joseph Donnelly, Bryan Smith and Richard Washburn collaborating with Debra Sullivan at the KU Medical Center, received a new, one-year award “Growth Hormone Use in Prader-Willi Syndrome and Obese Adults” from the Children’s Mercy Hospital (prime contractor to GENENTECH, INC) which began May 23, 2005.

5. Mabel Rice received a new, eight month award “Merrill Conference Sponsorship – Phoenix” from NIH which began June 1, 2005.

6. Dean Williams and Kathryn Saunders, in collaboration with Michael Perone @ West Virginia University and Iser DeLeon and Michael Cataldo at Kennedy Krieger Institute, received a new, five-year award “Laboratory Models of Maladaptive Escape Behaviors” from NICHD which began June 1, 2005.

7. Susan Kemper received a new, five-year award “Dual Task Costs to Adults’ Language Production” from NIA which began June 15, 2005.

8. Joseph Donnelly, Bryan Smith and Richard Washburn collaborating with Cheryl Gibson, Matthew Mayo and Debra Sullivan at the KU Medical Center, received a five-year renewal “Long-Term Exercise, Weight Loss and Energy Balance” from NIDDK which began July 1, 2005.

Note to readers: if I missed anyone who has received an award for a new grant recently, I apologize in advance. If you have, please let me know at your earliest convenience so this information can be included in the next newsletter.

Comments and questions to: lifespan@ku.edu


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