Lifeline Online Newsletter

LifeSpan Banner

May 2004

News for the investigators, staff and associates of the Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies

LSI Lifeline Online May 2004 Issue 76

Karen Henry, editor kahenry@ku.edu

The Life Span Institute at the University of Kansas
1052 Dole Human Development Center
1000 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, KS 66045-7555
(785) 864-4295 TDD (785) 864-5051

Back issues at LSI web site: http://www2.ku.edu/~lsi/news/index.shtml

Submit your presentations: A calendar and archive of seminars, presentations, posters and training by and of interest to Life Span investigators begin at http://www.lsi.ku.edu/lsi/internal/seminars/index.htm. Send your submissions to jessica@ku.edu.

Contents

Life Span in the News
NIH changes policy on consortium indirect costs counting against direct cost caps
Glen White honored for research, teaching and advocacy by national organization
Bobbi Fabrycky wins national award for child care provider support
Zamarripa, Beasley recognized for 35 years of service; Walker for15 years; Lorenzen for 5 years
Head Start Positive Behavior Support Project
Institute Activities
Central Office News

Life Span in the News

Joe Donnelly’s 5-year classroom exercise study, which includes children in Lawrence-area schools among the 5,000 northeast Kansas children in the Physical Activity Across the Curriculum project, was featured on the front page of Lawrence Journal World at: http://www.ljworld.com/section/citynews/story/170441

Yen Vo, one of the first three Ford Fellows from Vietnam, could choose anywhere in the world to study. She chose the University of Kansas because of the international reputation of Professor Glen White, director of the Research and Training Center on Independent Living. Her goal: to return to Vietnam to resume her role as a national leader of people with disabilities - this time with an M.A. in hand that would back advocacy with research. She was the profiled as the 2004 KU graduate on page one of the Lawrence Journal World at http://www.ljworld.com/section/citynews/story/171034.

Rud Turnbull enumerated the legislative issues of concern to people with disabilities and their families, particularly the criminalization of people with mental illness in his May 19 Lawrence Journal World column at http://www.ljworld.com/section/citynews/story/170610. Turnbull serves as the chairman of the board of trustees of the Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law.

Dot Nary and Glen White were disappointed with the recent U.S. Supreme Court that allowed people to sue states with inaccessible courthouses under the ADA without addressing other inaccessible state facilities. See http://www.ur.ku.edu/News/04N/MayNews/May18/nary.html.

NIH changes policy on consortium indirect costs counting against direct cost caps

Paul Diedrich, Associate Director for Project Development

Finally, the NIH has decided that consortium indirect costs do not count against overall direct costs on RFAs with direct cost limits. The announcement follows and is at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-04-040.html.

Change In Direct Cost Limitations On Solicited Applications
Release Date: April 30, 2004
Notice: NOT-OD-04-040

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

NIH announces a revision of its policy on direct cost limitations on solicited applications published after this notice. Applications in response to those Program Announcements (PAs) and Requests for Applications (RFAs) that include a limitation on direct costs are to exclude from that limit the facilities and administrative (F&A) costs requested by consortium participants. The F&A costs requested by the consortium will be reflected in the PHS 398 application according to current instructions, and F&A costs awarded under these programs will continue to be awarded under the current practice. However, these consortium F&A costs will not be counted as a direct cost when determining if an applicant is in compliance with a direct cost limitation on a solicited application.

As stated in NIH’s Roadmap Research Teams of the Future, initiative, NIH recognizes the increased need for support of interdisciplinary research and research teams. Programs that include a limitation on direct costs without the exclusion of consortium F&A costs create a disincentive to the establishment of consortiums, as the inclusion of a consortium’s associated F&A costs reduce the amounts which can be requested for other direct costs within a cost ceiling. This change will allow applicants for these programs to propose the necessary research teams via consortium arrangement without a negative impact their ability to fully utilize the direct cost limitations of the solicitation.

Please note that this does not change the NIH policy on the acceptance of applications requesting direct costs of $500,000 or more for any one year (see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-02-004.html).
If you have questions on this Notice, please contact the Grants Management Specialist listed in the RFA/PA, or the Division of Grants Policy at (301) 435-0949.

Glen White honored for research, teaching and advocacy by national organization

Glen White, Director of the Research and Training Center for Independent Living received one of the first awards for Distinguished Research, Teaching, and Advocacy from the National Association on Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers April 26 in Washington, D.C.

Bobbi Fabrycky wins national award for child care provider support

Pat White, Parsons LSI Program Assistant

Bobbi Fabrycky, Coordinator of Child Care Resource and Referral Services for Child Care Focus: Resource & Referral in Parsons, has earned national recognition for her work in supporting the child care providers in a five-county service delivery area in southeast Kansas.

Fabrycky is the recipient of the Child Care Resource and Referral Excellence in Service Award’s category of Provider Support, presented by The National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (NACCRRA). This national honor is awarded through a nomination process and goes to an outstanding service support provider from one state each year. The award was announced in February at the NACCRRA Symposium in Washington, D.C. and presented to Fabrycky March 19 at the Kansas Association of Resource and Referral Agencies’ (KACCRRA) annual meeting in Salina, Kansas. She also received a full professional membership to NACCRRA.

Fabrycky’s tenacity in promoting professional development and innovative fundraising that supports those services was highlighted in a recent interview with Patty Ryan, NACCRRA’s membership director. Fabrycky has worked with and advised numerous Child Development Associate (CDA) candidates working toward a CDA credential. She also has worked with Labette Community College and Independence Community College in their efforts to support early childhood professionals. She connects child care providers to lending resources and professional information such as KACCRRA’s T.E.A.C.H., a scholarship and compensation program and WAGE$, an education-based salary supplement program. She promotes Child Care Focus through a media campaign and email newsletter.

The award was the first of its kind given by NACCRRA, the nation's network of child care resource and referral agencies. Child Care Focus: Resource and Referral is a member of the Kansas Network, the Kansas Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (KACCRRA). Since 1986, NACCRRA has been working to improve the system of early learning for children by supporting child care experts and promoting national policies and partnerships committed to the development and learning of all children. This Excellence in Service Award category was created and implemented by NACCRRA members nationwide.

Zamarripa, Beasley honored for 35 years of service; Walker for15 years; Lorenzen for 5 years

Edward Zamarripa, a.k.a. Ed Z at LSI, was honored for 35 years of service to KU on April 28. He said that he came for 5 years and has so far stayed for 35.

Ed, who helped build LSI into one of the premier disabilities and research centers in the country, now manages a budget of close to $35 million in 2004 in his role as director of finance and administration.

Life Span Institute Director Steven Warren deemed Zamarripa a “dean of center administrators” and acknowledged him as one of the strengths of the LSI.

Alva Beasley, was also honored for 35 years of service by KU on April 28. Alva began working at Juniper Gardens on April 1, 1969 as an observer at schools in Kansas City, Kansas. Between 1973-1979 she was trained as a research assistant in a paraprofessional program offered by Juniper Gardens. She moved in to an administrative position in 1979 and in 1992 she became the Juniper Gardens Central Office Manager and continues in that capacity today.

Dale Walker was honored for 15 years of service by KU, all of them associated with the LSI. However, she’s actually been at Juniper Gardens beginning as a graduate student since 1982, bringing her unofficial total up to 22 years. She became a Research Associate when she completed her Ph.D. in 1988, Assistant Research Professor in 1991, and this year was promoted to Associate Research Professor.

Finally, Christopher Lorenzen has been with the LSI for 5 years as a graphic designer and information specialist.

Congratulations and heartfelt thanks to all for making the Institute what it is today!

Head Start Positive Behavior Support Project

Susan L. Jack, Project Director

The Head Start Positive Behavior Support Project is designed to teach Head Start teachers and staff the principles of Positive Behavior Support (PBS) and encourage their implementation of PBS strategies in Head Start Centers. Now in its third year, SEK-CAP Head Start has devoted considerable resources to developing a program-wide PBS system that is being implemented in 15 centers across Southeast Kansas. This project utilizes a participatory action approach wherein teachers, program coordinators, and University personnel work collaboratively to accomplish the project objectives. The project’s goals include (a) Developing a training program in PBS for all Head Start staff, (b) Building a system of support for staff through team training, monthly follow-up, and ongoing consultation in PBS, and (c) monitoring the effectiveness of this model for implementing PBS in early childhood settings. By developing internal expertise in using multiple strategies to promote positive behavior in all children enrolled in their programs, Head Start staff can engage community partners in developing cross-disciplinary strategies related to individual child needs.

Project implementation during Year 1 was focused on developing training for center-based teaching staff in the fundamentals of PBS. A core group of participants was developed from the Head Start management team who provided feedback and input into the development of the training material and format. This group continues to meet monthly to plan, problem-solve, and further refine the project. Initial training modules included preventing problem behavior through environmental design and effective instructional strategies, as well as functional behavioral assessment and intensive intervention strategies for individual children. A 2-day training was provided to lead teaching staff and a 1-day training provided to all center-based staff. Follow-up training was provided for lead teaching staff at 6-8 week intervals throughout the program year. PBS consultation and facilitated problem solving was provided for classrooms serving children with more significant behavioral challenges.

During Year 2 of the project, pairs of classroom teaching staff were trained in additional PBS practices, including strategies for increasing the social/emotional competence of children. In addition, staff providing home-based services to children and their families (ages 0-5) have been trained in the fundamentals of PBS during the fall of 2003. The third major thrust of this second year was to engage community partners in the PBS project. Additional training has been offered to mental health, special education, and child care partners with the goal of infusing a PBS approach in all aspects of service delivery.

The focus of the project during Year 3 will be to continue the training for all levels of staff and community partners. Teaching staff will be given further training on the behavioral assessment and intervention process for children exhibiting the most severe problem behavior. Targeted training will be developed for childcare partners in the larger Head Start service area, as well as family members who desire PBS training. Finally, parent training kits are being developed to help transfer the core content of the PBS curriculum to families in an easy to use, activity-based format. These kits will be available for use in the Fall of 2004.

Institute Activities

Honors

Mike Wehmeyer received the School of Education Outstanding Faculty Member Research Award.
Eva Horn received a Graduate School Mentor Award from the School of Education. This award was based on student nominations.
Holly Storkel received a Graduate School Mentor Award from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This award was based on student nominations.

Promotions

R. Matthew Reese was promoted to Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

Dale Walker was promoted to Associate Research Professor in the Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies.

Glen White was promoted to Full Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Life and Senior Scientist in the Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies.

Jennifer Zarcone was promoted to Research Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

Publications

Crosland, K.A., Zarcone, J.R., Schroeder, S.R., Zarcone, T.J., & Fowler, S. (in press). Use of an antecedent analysis and a force sensitive platform to compare stereotypic behavior and motor tics. American Journal on Mental Retardation.

Doughty, A.H., Meginley, M.E., Doughty (Haag), S.S., & Lattal, K.A. (2004). Psychological distance to reward: Equating the number of stimulus and response segments. Behavioural Processes, 66, 73-82.

Doughty, A.H., Williams, D.C., & Saunders, K.J. (2004). Sustaining attention in adults with mild mental retardation [Abstract]. Proceedings of the 37th Gatlinburg Conference on Research and Theory in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 139.<.

Doughty, S.S., & Anderson, C.M. (2004). Effects of noncontingent reinforcement and functional communication training on problem behavior and mands. Education and Treatment of Children. Manuscript accepted pending revision.

Doughty, S.S., Chase, P.N., & O'Shields, E.M. (in press). The effects of rate building on fluent performance: A review and commentary. The Behavior Analyst.

Freeman, R., Smith, C., Zarcone, J., Kidwell, P., Tieghi-Benet, M., & Wickham, D. (in press). Building a state-wide plan for embedding positive behavior support in human service organizations. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions.

Froehlich-Grobe, K., & White, G.W. (2004). Promoting physical activity among women with mobility impairments: A randomized-controlled trial to assess a home- and community-based intervention. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 85, 640-648.

Haag, S.S., Anderson, C.M., Williams, D.C., & Saunders, K.J. (2004). Establishing control of self-stimulatory responding by an antecedent stimulus using punishment. [Abstract]. Proceedings of the 37th Annual Gatlinburg Conference on Research and Theory in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 121.

Hill Karrer, J., & Karrer, R. (in press). Regional brain intercorrelations among individuals with Down syndrome: Linkages to behavioral and neuropsychological phenotypes. International Review of Research in Mental Retardation.

Hunter, S., Karrer, R., & Nelson, M. (submitted). Does infant visual attention predict later performance? An Event-related potential and looking behavior analysis.

Karrer, R., & Hill Karrer, J. (submitted). Temporal cues of a visual stimulus sequence can produce expectancy and endogenous ERP components by infants six months of age.

Kimbrough Kidwell, P., Freeman, R., Smith, C., & Zarcone, J. (in press). Designing a supportive learning environment for professionals by integrating online instruction with active mentoring in applied settings. The Internet and Higher Education.

Kimbrough Kidwell, P., Freeman, R., Smith, C., Zarcone, J., & Tieghi-Benet, M. (2004). Embedding Online Instruction on PBS into Staff Development Systems. Kansas Institute for Positive Behavior Support newsletter. Available:http://www.kipbs.lsi.ku.edu/newsletter/vol1n1.htm

Lawson, H. A., & Sailor, W. (2005). Integrating Services, Collaborating, and Developing Connections with Schools. In Skrtic, T.M., Harris, K.R., & Shriner, J.G. (Eds.) Special Education Policy and Practice (pp. 526-558). Denver, London, Sydney: Love Publishing Company.

Nary, D.E., White, G.W., Budde, J.F., & Vo, H.Y. (2004). Identifying employment and vocational rehabilitation concerns of people with traditional and emerging disabilities. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 20, 71-77.

Saunders, K., Chaney, L., & Doughty, A. (2004). Developing the alphabetic principle in adults with mental retardation: Abstracting vowel sounds [Abstract]. Proceedings of the 37th Annual Gatlinburg Conference on Research and Theory in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 134.

Saunders, R., & Saunders, M. (2004). Comparison of preference testing methods in people with profound multiple impairments [Abstract]. Proceedings of the 37th Annual Gatlinburg Conference on Research and Theory in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 149.

Stewart, K., Suchowierska, M., Chaney, L., & Saunders, K. (2004). Recombinative generalization of within-syllable units in constructed spelling [Abstract]. Proceedings of the 37th Annual Gatlinburg Conference on Research and Theory in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 141.

White, G.W., Suchowierska, M., & Campbell, M. (2004). Strategies for a systematic implementation of participatory action research in community research. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 85, S3-S12.

Williams, D.C., Bejarano, R., Doughty, A.H., & Perone, M. (2004). Toward a laboratory model of maladaptive escape behavior in people with developmental disabilities [Abstract]. Proceedings of the 37th Annual Gatlinburg Conference on Research and Theory in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, 138.

Presentations
Bejarano, R., & Williams, D.C. (2004, April). Eliminating off-task behaviors during transitions between activities. Poster presented at the meeting of the Kansas Association for Behavior Analysis, Lawrence, KS.

Caruso, M., Lewine, J., Zarcone, J., Thompson, T., Ward, S., Young, J., Moore, L., Popescu, M., Holsen, L., Butler, M. (March, 2004). Magnetoencephalographic components in Prader-Willi syndrome. Paper presented at the Gatlinburg Conference on Research and Theory in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, San Diego, CA.

Cress, P. (2004, May). Online resources for accessible information technology and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Presentation at the National American with Disabilities Act Symposium and Expo, Kansas City, MO.

DeLuccie, M., Lindeman, D.P., Campbell, M., & Thompson, B. (2004, April). Together we can: Enhancing professional development through the work of the early childhood higher education consortium. Paper presented at the Midwest Association for the Education of Young Children Conference, Overland Park, KS.

Ellerbeck, K., Ansari, M., Dhar, M., & Jacobson, J. (May 3, 2004). Sex Differences in Immune Responsiveness to Oxytocin: Role of Galpha q. Presentation at the Pediatric Academic Societies’ Meeting, San Francisco, CA.

Englebrick, L., McCart, A., Rios, J., Cottrell, B., Riley, N., Englebrick, L., Wolf, N., Lassen, S., Choi, H., & Griggs, P. Making Positive Differences…Locally and Nationally. Kansas City, Kansas School District.

Fabrycky, B. (2004, March). Orientation to child care center management. Presentation at the Child Care Association of Wichita's Director Chair conference, Wichita, KS.

Fabrycky, B., & Fiscus, J. (2004, April). CDA! What's in it for me? Presentation at the Midwest Association for the Education of Young Children, Overland Park, KS.

Freeman, R. (April 28, 2004). Kansas Institute for Positive Behavior Support. Governor’s Commission on Autism.

Freeman, R. (February 12, 2004). Team-based positive behavior support. Minnesota Autism Center. Minneapolis, MN.

Freeman, R. (February 23, 2004). School-wide positive behavior support: A systematic approach for decreasing problem behaviors and increasing appropriate social behaviors. Johnson County Children’s Coordinating Council Seminar. Olathe, KS.

Freeman, R. (February, 3, 2004). Positive behavior support in community settings. Interactive videoconference. University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Research, and Service. University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Freeman, R. (March 23, 2004). Positive behavior support training system development. University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Research, and Service. University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Freeman, R. (March 30, 2004). Introduction, overview, and breakout session for fall forum on positive behavior support: Coaches training. University of Kansas. Lawrence, KS.

Holsen, L., Zarcone, J., Thompson, T., Ward, S., Caruso, M., Butler, M., & Savage, C. (March, 2004). Food-related compulsive behavior in Prader-Willi syndrome using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Paper presented at the Gatlinburg Conference on Research and Theory in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, San Diego, CA.

Jack, S.L., Broyles, L., & Lindeman, D.P. (2004, April). Implementing positive behavior support in Head Start Programs: A systems approach. Presentation at the Midwest AEYC Conference, Overland Park, KS.

Lindeman, D.P. (2004, March). Building resources to implement a unified early childhood education Licensure: Role of the State Improvement Grant. Poster presentation at the Joint Personnel Preparation/State Improvement/ CSPD Conference, Washington, DC.

Martell, S., & Turbiville, V. (May 17-18, 2004). Great Expectations. Panel presentation at SpecialQuest, San Francisco, CA.

Olson, K., & Black-Moore, P. (2004, April). Anxiety and developmental disabilities. Workshop presented as an introduction to over 200 people at the 20th Annual Sharing Our Best Conference, Beatrice, NE.

Ottlinger, K., Klinehammer-Tramill, J., & Lindeman, D.P. (2004, March). The Kansas SIG: Promoting continuous improvement in personnel preparation for general and special educators in Kansas. Paper presentation at the Joint Personnel Preparation/State Improvement/CSPD Conference, Washington, DC.

Sack, S. (March 2004). Consumers speak out on directing personal attendant services. Poster presented at the 20th Annual Pacific Rim Conference on Disabilities, Kauai, HI.

Sack, S. (March 2004). Survey of assistive technology use: The impact of acquiring augmentative communication and mobility devices. Poster presented at the 20th Annual Pacific Rim Conference on Disabilities, Kauai, HI.

Saunders, K.J. (April 2004). Studies in the foundation of reading in individuals with mental retardation. Distinguished Scientist Lecture Series, Kennedy-Krieger Institute of Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD.

Utley, C.A., Bowman, L.J., Thorne, S., & Hashimoto, K. (2004). Evaluating Positive Behavior Support Implementation: Using Office Referrals to Decrease Problem Behaviors in Urban Schools. Presentation at Applied Behavior Analysis Conference, Boston, MA.

Wehmeyer, M. (April 13, 2004) Keynote address. No Content Left Behind: Self-Determination in the Era of Standards-Based Reform. Capacity Building Institute sponsored by the National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSETT) on in New Orleans. The institute was designed to address school-based strategies for supporting students' development of self-determination skills in the context of leadership and standards-based reform. NECSETT is based at the Institute on Community Integration at the University of Minnesota.

Wehmeyer, M. & Palmer, S. (April 13, 2004) Team leaders for breakout sessions to promote self-determination for students with disabilities at the Capacity Building Institute sponsored by the National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSETT) on in New Orleans.

White, G.W. (2004, April). Leadership training for emerging Peruvian leaders with disabilities to promote full participation in the community: Teaching the core competency of community problem solving. Lima, Perú.

White, G.W., & Suchowierska, M. (2004, April). Participatory Action Research: Its importance in rehabilitation research and practice. The 24th Annual National Association of Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Meeting, Washington, DC.

Williams, D.C. (March 2004). Relations between basic and applied behavioral analysis: Translational research and the human operant laboratory. Invited address to the Annual Texas Association for Behavior Analysis Conference, Dallas, TX.

Woods, J.J., & Lindeman, D.P. (April 2004). Teaching social and communication skills within play and everyday routines. Paper presented at the National Training Institute on Effective Practices: Supporting Young Children’s Social/Emotional Development and Addressing Challenging Behavior, Clearwater Beach, FL.

Zarcone, J., Freeman, R., Smith, C., Peyton, R., Lindauer, S., & Richman, D. (April 2004). Applications of functional analysis. Paper presented at the Kansas Association for Behavior Analysis conference, Lawrence, KS.

Technical Assistance

Wayne Sailor traveled to Connecticut to provide ongoing technical assistance to the Connecticut School District on May 6-7.

Wayne Sailor traveled to California 14th to provide ongoing technical assistance to the Ravenswood School District on May 12, 13.

Jacquelyn Hampton provided technical assistance to Spirit of the Children in New York City. She reviewed a grant proposal submitted to HHS in May.

Memberships

Pamela Cress, KAN Be Healthy Provider Education Committee.

Bobbi Fabrycky, regional representative, State Advisory Committee on Child Care.

Rachel Freeman, Board Member, National Association for Positive Behavior Support. February, 2004-present.

Rachel Freeman, Chair of subcommittee on website design for the Association for Positive Behavior Support. 2004. www.apbs.org

Central Office News and Announcements

Project Development

Paul Diedrich, Associate Director for Project Development

Past Submissions not Previously Reported

1. Mary Abbott submitted a new, one-year proposal “Capacity Building: Preventing the Life Long Effects of Illiteracy” to the Ewing M. Kauffman FUND for Greater Kansas City on May 11, 2004.

2. Glen White and Michael Fox submitted their third-year continuation “Disaster Response Training to Help Disabled Persons” to the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine on May 14, 2004.

3. Stephen Fowler submitted a new, three-month proposal “The Effects of Validating Compounds on Tremor Responses in Fischer 344 Rats” to the Eli Lilly and Company on May 28, 2004, 2004.

4. Stephen Fowler and Troy Zarcone submitted a new, one-year proposal “Building the Grid Actometer” to the Genzyme Corporation on May 28, 2004, 2004.

5. Richard Saunders, James Sherman, Muriel Saunders, Nancy Brady, Kathy Thiemann and Steven Warren, in collaboration with Lesley Olswang (University of Washington), submitted the five-year competing continuation of the program project “Communication of People with Mental Retardation” to NICHD on June 1, 2004.

6. Hugh Catts submitted his eighth-year progress report “Relationship Between Language and Reading Abilities” via the University of Iowa (prime contractor, Bruce Tomblin PI, “Collaboration on Specific Language Impairment”) to NIDCD on June 1, 2004.

7. Mabel Rice submitted her eighth-year progress report “Diagnosis of Developmental Language Impairment” via the University of Iowa (prime contractor, Bruce Tomblin PI, “Collaboration on Specific Language Impairment”) to NIDCD on June 1, 2004.

8. Hugh Catts submitted a new, five-year subcontract “Adult Psych/Social Outcomes of Primary Language Disorder” via the University of Iowa (prime contractor, Bruce Tomblin, PI) to NIH on June 1, 2004.

9. Adam Doughty submitted a new, one-year proposal “Resistance to Change: Refining the Autism Phenotype” to the NIMH B/Start competition on June 1, 2004.

10. Susan Kemper submitted a new, five-year proposal “Dual Task Costs to Younger and Older Adults’ Language Production” to NIA on June 1, 2004.

11. Kathleen Baggett and Judith Carta submitted a new, two-year proposal “Infant-Net” to NIMH (prime contractor, Oregon Research Institute, Edward Feil, PI) on June 1, 2004.

12. Judith Carta, Dale Walker and Kathleen Baggett submitted a new, three-year proposal “Partnerships to Develop Meaningful Outcome Measures for Early Head Start Children and Families” to the HHS-Head Start University Partnerships competition on June 1, 2004.

13. Dale Walker (Principal Investigator) and Stacie Kirk (graduate researcher) submitted a new, two-year proposal “Partnerships to Use Outcome Measures to Inform and Monitor Language-Promoting Interventions in Early Head Start Programs” to the HHS-Head Start Graduate Student Research Grants competition on June 1, 2004.

14. Denise Poston submitted a new, six-month proposal “Technology that helps Locate and Access Appropriate Online Information for Service Providers and Families of K-12 Children with Disabilities” via prime contractor the Inshperion Learning Corporation to the DE/NIDRR Small Business Innovation Research Program – Phase I on June 1, 2004.

Upcoming Submissions

Will report on in next months issue.

New Awards (not previously funded) Information

No new awards this past month.


The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression, and genetic information in the university’s programs and activities. Retaliation is also prohibited by university policy. The following persons have been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies and are the Title IX coordinators for their respective campuses: Executive Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity & Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 West Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS 66045, 785-864-6414, 711 TTY (for the Lawrence, Edwards, Parsons, Yoder, and Topeka campuses); Director, Equal Opportunity Office, Mail Stop 7004, 4330 Shawnee Mission Parkway, Fairway, KS 66205, 913-588-8011, 711 TTY (for the Wichita, Salina, and Kansas City, Kansas, medical center campuses).