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May June 2006 Issue 91

The Lifeline Online is a newsletter of the Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies at the University of Kansas

Online, printable version and back issues.

Karen Henry, Editor
Drew Rosdahl, Assistant Editor

The Life Span Institute at the University of Kansas
1052 Dole Human Development Center
1000 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, KS 66045-7555
(785) 864-4295 TDD
(785) 864-5051
lsi.ku.edu

In This Issue

Donnelly to direct new KU-Children's Mercy obesity research, treatment and public health center

Greenwood and Staker steer effort to build Children's Campus in KCK

The Life Span Institute works in Western Kansas

Life Span Institute names assistant director for information technology

Friends of LSI Announce Annual Graduate Research Assistant Awards Competition

Kansas AAMR announces student paper competition

Catts' group wins ASHA Editor's Award

Lawrence hosts Council for Exceptional Children conference

April 20 Eden presentation available online

Project Development

NIH E-Submission Update

Institute Activities

The Centers and their inception dates

The Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies is a center of centers collectively dedicated to discovering research-based solutions for the challenges of human and community development, disabilities, and aging.

The Life Span Institute at Parsons 1956

Juniper Gardens Children's Project 1964

Kansas Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Center 1967

Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities 1973

Research and Training on Independent Living 1980

Child Language Doctoral Program 1983

Beach Center on Disability
1988

Gerontology Center 1990

Merrill Advanced Studies Center 1990

Work Group for Community Health and Development 1990

Center for Physical Activity and Weight Management 2001

Center for Biobehavioral Neurosciences in Communication Disorders 2002

Friends of the Life Span Institute

Ross and Marianna Beach

Michael Cataldo

Gregorio Diaz

David and Margaret Ekerdt

Steve Fawcett and Kathleen McCluskey-Fawcett

Charles R. Greenwood and Judith J. Carta

Vance and Marilyn Hall

Betty Hart

Floyd and Frances Horowitz

Todd Little and Patty Hawley
 
Amy McCart and Dan Biles

James and Lee McLean

Virginia and Fred Merrill

Bob Mirman

Terry and Judi Paul

Mabel Rice

Todd and Cheryl Risley

Dick and Ruth Schiefelbusch

Steve and Carolyn Schroeder

Joe and Rita Spradlin

John T. Stewart III and Linda B. Stewart

Rud and Ann Turnbull

John and Patty Turner

Gary Waldron and Sunny Foster

Steve Warren and Eva Horn

Michael and Kathy Wehmeyer

Glen and Nancy White

David and Dee Yoder

Ed and Mary Ann Zamarripa
50 Years of Discovery logo

Register HereMark your calendar for Friday, September 29, and Saturday, September 30, when we'll be celebrating and reflecting on our last 50 years of "doing science and doing good" as well as envisioning the future and our roles and responsibilities in it.. For more information or to register. contact Carolyn Thurman at cthurman@ku.edu.

 

 

Donnelly to direct new KU-Children's Mercy obesity research, treatment and public health center

Joseph E. DonnellyJoseph E. Donnelly, director of the Center for Physical Activity and Weight Managment, one of the Life Span Institute's 12 affiliated research centers, will lead a major effort to reduce childhood obesity from a new facility in the urban core of Kansas City, Missouri, at one of the premier pediatric hospitals in the country.

The center is a partnership between KU and Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics and to date has attracted support from the Hall Family Foundation and the Greater Kansas City Community Foundation, among others.

Reseachers and clinicians from KU, KUMC, Children's Mercy, the University of Missouri-Kansas City have coalesced around the center to mount a multi-pronged effort to address the obesity epidemic, which now afflicts 30 percent of U.S. children and two-thirds of U.S. adults.

The Center for Physical Activity, Nutrition and Weight Management will enroll 300 children and 500 adults in clinical settings in 3- to 6-month research programs by fall 2009 and more than 30,000 children in school and home-based programs in Kansas and Missouri by 2011.

More. KC Star. KC Business Journal. KCTV Channel 5.

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Greenwood and Staker steer effort to build Children's Campus in KCK

Charles GreenwoodThe May 20 Kansas City Star published the announcement of plans to build one of the most amibtious development projects in downtown Kansas Ctiy, Kansas in decades . The Children's Campus of Kansas Ctiy would bring together Head Start programs, dental and health-care services, family support agencies and teacher training and, the Life Span Institute's own Juniper Gardens Children's Project, directed by Charles Greenwood, as well as Project EAGLE, directed by Martha Staker, an affiiated LSI researcher. The Children's Museum of Kansas City would also relocate the the four-city block campus near the present location of Juniper Gardens near Fifth and Minnesota Streets.

A Children's Campus is the brainchild of Staker and Greenwood, and they, along with representatives of several other agencies committed to urban children and their families in Kansas City, have lead the effort to bring it to life.

The group has acquired some of the land for the project including 50,000 square feet of real estate donated Bank Midwest and has launched a $19 million capital campaign. Construction could begin as early as the end of 2006. Full story.

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The Life Span Institute works in Western Kansas

R. Matt ReeseThe knowledge generated at the University of Kansas benefits the citizens of Kansas through collaborations, consultations, research studies, technical assistance and training of practitioners, children and families, and community groups. The interests of Life Span Institute’s affiliates, in particular, address difficult human services and educational challenges in the western part of Kansas.

Underpinning the Institute’s continuing growth and success in developing creative and model approaches, is the strength of allied departments such as Special Education, Speech-Language-Hearing, Applied Behavioral Science, Psychology and Gerontology, among others. What follows are a few examples of how the Life Span Institute is working for Western Kansas.

The Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities has facilitated training in Western Kansas for several years. Kathleen Olson, an LSI-Parsons-based researcher, has overseen training to the Community Service Providers who support individuals with developmental disabilities across the state including Western Kansas for more than 15 years. Training has included training for direct support professionals working for community service providers.  

The Developmental Services of Northwest Kansas (DSNWK) (main office in Hays) provides services to individuals with developmental disabilities living in the 18 counties in Northwest Kansas. Arrowhead West (main office in Dodge City) serves 13 counties. One of the Olson group projects, Kansans Mobilizing for Workforce Change, has worked with DSNWK and Arrowhead West to reduce turnover of direct support professionals. DSNWK is one of the first sites implementing Ad Astra, the Direct Support Registered Apprenticeship Program.

Wendy Parent, a Lawrence-based researcher and assistant director of KUCDD, oversees a grant that will increase the employability of young women with developmental disabilities across the state. Research indicates that males with disabilities are more likely to be employed, earn higher wages, work full time, and remain employed than are females. When employed, females with disabilities are more likely to be employed in unskilled jobs than males in spite of a lack of difference between sexes in I.Q., achievement, and basic job skills.

The Women’s Equitable Employment Act Program promotes gender equity among young women, while encouraging them to self-direct their own goals by gaining the experience and skills needed to achieve competitive, nontraditional employment. Currently, the components of this grant are being implemented in 7 high schools throughout Kansas. The participating high schools include: Newton, Halstead, Garden City, Baldwin Washburn Rural (Topeka, KS), Topeka West, and Topeka High. Thus far, training in the grant components has been provided to both school personnel and selected female students. Parent anticipates that by this September, at least one student from each school will identify her nontraditional career goals, receive the essential supports needed, and obtain employment that fits within those goals. The grant will continue for 3 more years, adding seven more high schools during the second year and fourteen middle schools during the third and fourth years.

Chris Smith, an LSI Parsons-based researcher, just completed a project to train and give technical assistance to direct support and administrative staff members of Kansas Head Start and Community Action affiliates and other related agencies to better support children with disabilities and their families with intensive, site-specific information about integrated outcomes and adaptations to local systems. These efforts focused on the integration of comprehensive needs assessments, logic models, strategic planning processes, and continuous evaluation systems. The project included significant time in Western Kansas including Wichita (Augusta) area, Salina, Abilene, and Hays), as well as other parts of the state.

Elizabeth Stewart, a researcher in the Center for Physical Activity and Weight Management, will be serving on the faculty of CME/CNE (continuing medical education/continuing nursing education) conference for physicians and nurses called "Sizzling Summer 2006: Improving Outcomes for your Patients." Stewart will be discussing how research on weight control can be translated into clinical practice. She will be discussing some of the recent findings in weight management research (including research in the KU Center) as well as providing some real-life, evidence-based strategies that clinicians can use in day-to-day practice.
 
Jean Ann Summers, a researcher with the Beach Center on Disability and Juniper Gardens Children’s Project, coordinates a study on early intervention that includes the Russell Child Development Center in Garden City as a research sites. The purpose of this study is to explore how families of infants and toddlers with disabilities are supported by existing programs. The other research sites are the Turner School District (Kansas City, Kansas) and Council Bluffs, Nebraska. Summers and colleagues have made two trips to Garden City so far and have spent time shadowing home visitors, interviewing families and staff, and sitting in on staff in-service training as well as staff meetings. 

Susan Bashinski, a research affiliated with the Beach Center on Disability, coordinates
the Kansas Low-Incidence Personnel Preparation  (KLIPP) grant, which has a subcontract with Fort Hays State University. The KLPP grant addresses the problem of significant personnel shortages that affect the capacity of Kansas’ schools to provide appropriate education to students who reflect the low-incidence categorical definition (e.g., severe multiple disabilities, deafness, blindness, deaf/blindness, severe intellectual disability). The Bashinski group are currently in the second year of what will be a three-year partnership with Fort Hays, to provide pre-service and in-service professional development opportunities for persons seeking initial licensure or renewing licensure in functional special education. On August 4 and 5 of this year, KLIPP is sponsoring a two-day professional development workshop in Hays. This workshop will be available for one undergraduate or graduate credit.  The title of the workshop is, “Assistive Technology, A to Z, for Learners with Cognitive or Sensory Disabilities” and will be presented by Kelly Fonner, an assistive technology specialist from Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.

The Kansas Inservice Training System (KITS), directed by David Lindeman, director of LSI Parsons, provides training, technical assistance, and consultation to infant/toddler early intervention and early childhood special education programs throughout the state. The newest KITS staff member, Phoebe Rinkel, recently renewed her western Kansas ties at a training event in Dodge City at Arrowhead West, Inc. (AWI), an infant/toddler network serving 13 western Kansas counties. Rinkel was the director of Children’s Services for AWI in the 1980s. During her tenure at AWI the agency provided services to children with disabilities from birth to age 5 in a 9 county-area serving perhaps a hundred children a year. Today, AWI has more than 100 children are on their roster at any given time, and over 700 children received services in 2005.

Teams across the state are participating in training related to one of the 8 curriculum-based assessment tools selected by the Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) to measure baseline and progress on the new Early Childhood Outcomes (ECO). These new outcomes are a result of US Department of Education requirements for states to assess the effectiveness of their early intervention and early childhood special education programs and outcomes for children and families receiving services.  KITS collaborated with KSDE and KDHE during the past year to develop and implement a statewide training using interactive television technology to prepare infant/toddler networks and school districts to fully meet the new ECO reporting requirements.  KITS will continue to support the state’s ECO initiative by facilitating training workshops on curriculum-based assessment and will be providing technical assistance to sites participating in the ECO pilot studies in the coming year.

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Life Span Institute names assistant director for information technology

Raymond_CheungRaymond_CheungRaymond Cheung joined the Life Span Institute as Assistant Director for Information Technology on June 26. Cheung was most recently a systems coordinator at Kansas State University where he also held positions in systems security and networking. Previously, he was a network coordinator at Marsh and McLennan in Toronto, Canada. He holds an MBA from K-State and BS and BCom from the University of Toronto.  He will be doing strategic planning on information technology for LSI as well managing the network and desktop support for Lawrence LSI. Please welcome Raymond and feel free to contact him at cheung@ku.edu.

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Friends of the Life Span Institute announce Graduate Research Assistant Awards Competition

The Friends of the Life Span Institute will recognize two outstanding graduate research assistants who are affiliated with a Life Span Institute project this year. One award will be given to an advanced graduate student who is at the dissertation stage in their graduate program. The second award is to be given to an especially promising graduate student who has completed their first or second year of graduate school. These awards are funded on an annual basis by the Friends of the Life Span Institute. The amount of each award is $1,500.00. These funds are to be used to support the student’s research and professional development.

Award Criteria The applicant must be a KU doctoral student in good standing and be presently affiliated with a Life Span Institute project associated with any of the LSI centers (i.e. The Kansas Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Center; the KU Center on Developmental Disabilities; The Life Span Institute at Parsons; The Juniper Gardens Children’s Project; the Beach Center on Disability; the Research and Training Center in Independent Living; The Gerontology Center; the Biobehavioral Neurosciences in Communication Disorders Center; the Child Language Doctoral Program; the Work Group on Health Promotion and Community Development; the Center for Physical Activity and Weight Management).

Both awards are specifically given in recognition of the potential of the student’s research/scholarship to contribute important new scientific knowledge relevant to meeting the challenges of human and community development, disability, or aging.

Interested graduate students should submit the following materials.

  1. A letter of application no more than two pages describing your short and long term career goals as well as the focus of your current research.
  2. A vita
  3. Two letters of recommendation, one of which must come from your major professor.

These materials need to be submitted by September 22, 2006, in care of Rob Hileman, The Life Span Institute, 1052 Dole Human Development Center. Questions about the review process should also be addressed to Rob via email at rheilman@ku.edu or phone 864-1997. Review Process Applications will be reviewed by a committee consisting of current Friends of the Life Span Institute. Friends members who have a current affiliation with any of Life Span Institute center or project will be excluded. The two recipients of this award will be invited to attend the Annual Dinner of the Friends in the spring of 2007.

Kansas Chapter of AAMR to hold student paper competition

Drew Rosdahl

The Kansas Chapter of the American Association on Mental Retardation (AAMR) will hold their annual competition for student research papers related to people with mental retardation or developmental disabilities.  The top three award winning students will be given an opportunity to provide a brief presentation part of the AAMR Presentation Strand for the 2006 InterHab Annual Conference. This year the conference is being held at the Capital Plaza Hotel in Topeka on October 25-27. If you are interested in more information or would like to submit an application click here.

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Catts' group wins ASHA Editor's Award

Drew Rosdahl

Hugh CattsHugh Catts, Chairman of the Department of Speech-Language-Hearing, has been selected for the Editor’s Award by American Speech Language Hearing Associations for the article, Are specific language impairment and dyslexia distinct disorders? published in the Vol.48 1378-1396 December 2005 Journal of Speech-Language-Hearing Research.The co-authors were Suzanne M. Adlof and Tiffany Hogan, post-doctoral students at the University of Kansas and Susan Ellis-Weismer, Professor of Communicative Disorders and Coordinator of the Waisman Center's Communication Processes Unit.at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.  The awards will be presented at the 2006 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in November in Miami Beach. 

The Editor’s Award is presented each year to the most meritorious article of each section of Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research as well as other journals.  The criteria for consideration are experimental design, teaching-education value, and scientific or clinical merit, contribution to the professions, theoretical impact, and/or other indices of merit.  If you are interested in reading the article the citation is:

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Lawrence hosts Council for Exceptional Children conference

Drew Rosdahl

On June 1st, The Kansas chapter of the Council of Exception Children (CEC) convened a conference on Instructional Ideas Useful in Working with Children Diagnosed with Autism that was attended by people from all over Kansas. The conference was co-sponsored by the Kansas Department of Education (KSDE), and Lawrence Special Education Services.  Topics ranged from recent increases in the number of children and youth being diagnosed with some form of autism to treatment from a family context.  Joung Min Kim, Kiok Kim, Sue Ann Kline, Kaye Otten, and Lee Stickle represented members of the University of Kansas and the KU Medical Center who were presenters at the conference.  The Kansas CEC will hold their primary annual conference on October 5-6th at the Lawrence Holidome convention center.

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April 20 Eden presentation available online

Drew Rosdahl

If you are interested in viewing the April 20 presentation by Professor Guinevere Eden on functional brain imaging of reading disorders, we have made it available via the University’s streaming server.  Eden spoke as part of the Kansas Colloquia on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  The speech is one hour twenty-three minutes in length.  To stream this movie, it is necessary to either have Real player and Quicktime or Real player and Windows Media Player.  If you do not currently have either combination of programs installed they can be installed by clicking on the links above.  If you are planning on viewing it with Real player and Windows Media Player click here.  If you are planning to view it with Quicktime or Real player click here.

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Project Development

May / June Project Development

Paul Diedrich, Associate Director for Project Development

Past Submissions not Previously Reported

1. Steve Fawcett and Jerry Schultz submitted a new, two-year proposal “Community Health Workers as Change Agents for Healthy and Cancer-Free Communities” in response to NIH’s PAR-05-026 - Community Participation in Research on May 17, 2006.

2. Steve Fawcett and Jerry Schultz submitted a second, new, two-year proposal “Community-led Intervention to Reduce Youth Access to Alcohol in Kansas City, Kansas” in response to NIH’s PAR-05-026 - Community Participation in Research on May 17, 2006.

3. David Lindeman submitted a new, one-year proposal “ECHO Consortium II” to KsDE on May 26, 2006.

4. Dean Williams and Kathryn Saunders submitted two, five-year subcontracts for a new PO1 “Transitional Analyses of Chronic Aberrant Behavior Across the Life-Span” to the Kennedy Krieger Institute – PI Michael Cataldo, prime contractor to NICHD, on June 1, 2006.

5. Steve Warren, Marc Fey and Paul Yoder submitted their second-year, non-competing continuation “Effects of Intensity of Early Communication Intervention”, KUMC prime, to NICHD on June 1, 2006.

6. Judith Carta, Dale Walker and Kathleen Baggett will submit their third-year continuation “Partnerships to Develop Meaningful Outcome Measures for Early Head Start Children and Families on June 1, 2006.

7. Eva Horn and Susan Palmer submitted their fourth-year continuation “Children’s School Success” to Indiana University (prime contractor to NICHD) on June 1, 2006.

8. Sara Sack submitted her ninth-year continuation “Assistive Technology Project” to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment on June 6, 2006.

9. Sara Sack submitted her fourth-year continuation “Equipment Exchange”  Increasing Access to Durable Medical Equipment” to the Kansas Department of SRS on June 6, 2006.

10. Susan Kemper submitted her second-year, non-competing continuation “Cost of Conversation After Stroke:  Functional Deficits Revealed After Speaking” to KUMC – PI Pat Pohl, prime contractor to AHA on June 7,  2006.

11. Dave Lindeman submitted his ninth-year continuation “Southeast Kansas Respite Care Services (SEKRS)” to the Parsons State Hospital and Training Center on June 8, 2006.

12. Wendy Parent submitted her second-year, grant performance report “Young Women with Developmental Disabilities Take Charge”  A Gender Equitable Model for Expanding Job Options Through Self-Determined Employment” to DE/WEAA on June 9, 2006.

13. Dave Lindeman submitted his continuation “Active Treatment Training Program” funded by the Parsons State Hospital and the Kansas Neurological Institute on June 9, 2006.

14. Susan Bashinski submitted her seventh-year continuation “Inclusive Network of Kansas (INKS):  Field Based Technical Assistance and Professional Development” to the Kansas Department of Education June 12, 2006.

15. Dave Lindeman submitted his ninth-year continuation “Kansas Inservice Training System” to the Kansas Department of Education June 12, 2006.

16. Dave Lindeman submitted his ninth-year continuation “Dual Diagnosis of Persons with Disabilities” to the Parsons State Hospital and Training Center on June 14, 2006.

17. Glen White submitted his third-year subcontract continuation “RRTC on Health and Wellness for Persons with Long Term Disabilities” to Oregon Health & Sciences University, prime contractor to DE/NIDRR, on June 14, 2006.

18. Chris Smith submitted his fourth-year continuation “Kids Crew:  The Independence USD 446 Community Learning Center” to USD 446, prime contractor to DE/OSEP, on June 15, 2006.

19. Mabel Rice submitted a new, one-year contract “Pediatric HIV/Aids Cohort Study (PHACS) to Tulane University – PI Russell Van Dyke, prime contractor to NICHD, on June 16, 2006.

20. Dave Lindeman submitted his ninth-year continuation “Kansas Inservice Training System: Infant and Toddler Component” to the Kansas Department of Education June 21, 2006.

21. Dave Lindeman submitted his continuation “Child Care Focus:  Resource and Referral Center” to the Kansas Association of Child Care Resource and Referral on June 22, 2006.

22. Dave Lindeman submitted his continuation “Child Care Focus: Infant-Toddler Initiative Project” to the Kansas Association of Child Care Resource and Referral on June 22, 2006.

23. Rachel Freeman submitted a new, one-year contract “Implementing School-wide Positive Behavior Support Using a District-wide Leadership Team Model in Three Kansas School Districts” to KsDE on June 23, 2006.

Upcoming Submissions

1. Susan Kemper will resubmit a five-year subcontract for an RO1 “Decomposing Executive Function in Aging, Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease” to KUMC – PI Joan McDowd, prime contractor to NIA, on July 1, 2006.

2. Dean Williams will resubmit a two-year contract for an R21 “Translational Research on NCR Interventions for Behavior Disorders” to Kennedy Krieger Institute on July 1, 2006.

3. Nancy Brady will resubmit a five-year proposal “Communication Success and AAC:  A Model of Symbol Acquisition” to NICHD on July 1, 2006.

4. Joseph Donnelly, Bryan Smith, Richard Washburn, Debra Sullivan, Cheryl Gibson, Matthew Mayo and Robert Lee will resubmit a five-year proposal “Equivalent Weight Loss for Phone and Clinical Weight Management Programs” to NIH on July 1, 2006. 

5. Steve Barlow, in collaboration with Kathleen Weatherstone at Overland Park Regional Medical Center and Jose Gierbolini at Stormont-Vail Hospital, will submit a five-year competing continuation, “Sensorimotor Control of the Human Orofacial System” to NIDCD on July 1, 2006. 

6. Mabel Rice will submit her fifth-year, non-competing continuation for the P30 Center “Biobehavioral Sciences in Communication Disorders” to NIDCD on July 1, 2006.

7. Matthew Stowe, H.R. Turnbull and Ann Turnbull will submit a four-year competing continuation “A Framework for Disability Perspectives on HGP” to NHGRI on July 1, 2006.

8. Steve Warren and Judith Carta will submit their fourth-year non-competing continuation subcontract “Preventing Child Neglect in High Risk Mothers” to University of Notre Dame – PI John Borkowski, prime contractor to NICHD, on July 1, 2006.

9. Ric Steele will submit his second-year, non-competing continuation “Effectiveness of a Treatment for Pediatric Obesity” to HHS on July 3, 2006.

10. Ann Turnbull, and Rud Turnbull will submit their third-year, non-competing continuation “RRTC on Policies Affecting Children with Disabilities-Beach IV” to DE/NIDRR on July 7, 2006.
 
11. Michael Wehmeyer will submit his fourth-year, grant performance report “The Impact of Interventions on Self-Determination and Adult Outcomes” to DE/NIDRR on July 7, 2006.

12. Michael Wehmeyer and Sean Smith will submit their final-year, grant performance report “Mental Retardation and Technology Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project” to DE/NIDRR on July 7, 2006.

New Awards (not previously funded) Information

1. Chris Smith received a new, five-month award “Developing a Performance Measurement Strategy for the Ohio Quality Assurance Systems Change Initiative” from the Ohio Department of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities that began April 25, 2006.

2. Chris Smith received a new, fourteen-month award “Developing a Quality Management Strategy for the Ohio Quality Assurance Systems Change Initiative” from the Ohio Department of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities that also began April 25, 2006.

3. Mabel Rice received a new, one-year contract “Pediatric HIV/Aids Cohort Study (PHACS) from Tulane University – PI Russell Van Dyke, prime contractor to NICHD that began September 30, 2005.

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NIH E-Submission Update

Jessica Black, Grants Monitor

New PI Assurance Signature Page
Beginning May 10, 2006, principal investigators will no longer need to sign the PHS 398 cover page (used for NIH proposals). Instead, institutions are required to keep on file a PI signature agreeing to the terms of each proposal. KUCR has created a form (PHS PI Assurance Signature Page) (which Paul Diedrich and I will get back along with the signed proposal) that must be signed by the PI. By signing the form you are agreeing, “1) that the information submitted within the application is true, complete and accurate to the best of the PI’s knowledge; 2) that any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements or claims may subject the PI to criminal, civil, or administrative penalties; and 3) that the PI agrees to accept responsibility for the scientific conduct of the project and to provide the required progress reports if a grant is awarded as a result of the application,” (PHS 398 Instructions Part III: T. Principal Investigator Assurance).

Multiple PI Pilot Update
Starting in September of 2006, NIH will award multiple-principal investigator projects. If you are interested in submitting a multiple-PI project, please look over the available funding opportunities at http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/multi_pi/ that allow this mechanism. Currently the competitions that allow this mechanism are limited, but NIH estimates more competitions by February of 2007. All PIs must be registered in the NIH Commons.

NIH Commons Registrations
Just a friendly reminder that all PIs who want to submit a proposal to NIH must be registered in the NIH Commons (AKA eRA Commons). If you need a login or to have your login affiliated with the University of Kansas, please contact Jessica Black at jessica@ku.edu or 785-864-0597.

Grants.gov: Project Summary vs. Project Narrative vs. Research Plan
Starting 02/01/07 all RO1s must be submitted using grants.gov. Twenty-six federal agencies post their funding opportunities at this web site and we anticipate that proposals for most agencies will ultimately be submitted through the site. One of the most important changes, besides electronic submission, is that grants.gov requires a new set of forms, the SF424 R&R (as opposed to the PHS 398) to submit proposals. One of the most confusing changes in the SF424 Research & Related instructions is their naming conventions, particularly the difference between the project summary, project narrative, and research plan.

The Project Summary is, in essence, an abstract: “A summary of the proposed activity suitable for dissemination to the public…It is meant to serve as a succinct and accurate description of the proposed work when separated from the application. State the application’s broad, long-term objectives and specific aims, making reference to the health relatedness of the project (i.e., relevance to the mission of the agency). Describe concisely the research design and methods for achieving the stated goals. This section should be informative to other persons working in the same or related fields and insofar as possible understandable to a scientifically or technically literate reader. Avoid describing past accomplishments and the use of the first person. Finally, please make every effort to be succinct. This section must be no longer than 30 lines of text, and follow the required font and margin specifications,” (SF 424 (R&R) Application Guide Part I: Instructions for Preparing and Submitting an Application).

The Project Narrative is not what we typically refer to as “the narrative,” but more of a lay-person abstract. “The second component of the Project Summary/Abstract (i.e., “Description”) is Relevance. Using no more than two or three sentences, describe the relevance of this research to public health. In this section, be succinct and use plain language that can be understood by a general, lay audience,” (SF 424 (R&R) Application Guide Part I: Instructions for Preparing and Submitting an Application).

Finally, the Research Plan is what we would call the typical “narrative.” This section is significantly different, so we have created a template complete with instructions to help you. If you are interested, please contact Jessica Black at jessica@ku.edu or 785-864-0597.

Upcoming Grants.gov Training
Confused yet? Paul Diedrich and I will be offering a hands-on training session using grants.gov Find and Apply mechanisms early this fall. Right now plans include navigating through the “Find” site to locate a solicitation, downloading PureEdge Viewer, downloading application packets, and working on forms and narrative pieces. We will also discuss policy changes and common pitfalls to avoid. If you are interested in attending this session please let me know (jessica@ku.edu or 785-864-0597) so we can select a timeframe that works best for most attendees and have adequate resources available.

Institute Activities

Honors

Cheryl Utley, Juniper Gardens Children's Project, named co-editor for Multiple Voices, A Publication of the Division for Culturally and Linuistically Diverse Exceptional Learners. A publication of the Council for Exceptional Children. Volume 9, Issue 1 - released June 9th, 2006.

Presentations

Barlow SM, Finan DS, Seibel L, Chu S, Poore M, Zimmerman E, Urish M, Estep M.  (2006).  Translational neuroscience: using patterned somatosensory stimulation to entrain oromotor activity in premature infants.  5th International Conference on Speech Motor Control, June 7-10, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Bashinski, S.M., Zody, A., Hauptman, M., Wilson, S., & and Guthrie, N. (2006, April).  Inclusive Network of Kansas (INKS) field-based technical assistance and professional development: Case examples. Kansas State Department of Education Annual Conference, Wichita, KS.

Blue-Banning, M. (2006, April). Creative employment options for adults with developmental disabilities. Presentation at KansTrans Transition Summit 2006, Wichita, KS.

Blue-Banning, M., & Poston, D. (2006, February). Making visions a reality for transition-age students and young adults. Presentation at Families Together, Inc. Conference: Together We Can Learn, Topeka, KS.

Brady, N., Bashinski, S.M., & Houghton, J. (2006, March). Teaching communicative gestures to young children who are deaf-blind through an Adaptive Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching (PMT) approach. Presentation at the Kansas Division of Early Childhood Education (KDEC) Conference, Overland Park, KS.

Hoover, J.R., & Storkel, H.L. (2006, June). Working memory in preschool children with and without phonological delays. Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders, Madison, WI.

Murphy-Herd, M., Stuckey, D., Bashinski, S.M., & Dunbar, M. (2006, April).  IntelliFeature this. Presentation at the 2006 Assistive Technology National Topical Conference, National Technical Assistance Consortium for Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind (NTAC), St. Louis, MO.

Misenheimer, A., Tassé, M., & Poston, D. New horizons: Self-direction in a managed care environment.

Palmer, S. B., & Wehmeyer, M.L. Technology use for people with intellectual disabilities -results of two U.S. surveys.

Palmer, S.B., Garner, N., Geiger, D., Johnstone, R., Withers, A., & Williams, P. (2006, March).  Self-determination and transition – What’s the big deal? Presentation at the Vocational Education for Special Populations Statewide Conference, College Station, TX. 

Palmer, S.B., Garner, N., Geiger, D., Johnstone, R., Withers, A., & Williams, P. (2006, March).  Practical ideas for self-determination and transition.Vocational Education for Special Populations Statewide Conference, College Station, TX. 

Palmer, S.B. (2006, April).  Fundamentals of self-determination. Arkansas Transition Summit, Little Rock, AR.

Palmer, S.B., & Walker, C. (2006, April).  Self-determination for the future. KansTrans: Transition Summit 2006. Wichita, KS.

Sailor, W. (2006, March). Linking schoolwide Positive Behavior Support to structural school reform: The Schoolwide Applications Model (SAM). Presentation at the 3rd International Conference on Positive Behavior Support, Reno, NV

Sailor, W. (2006, May). Response to intervention logic model for all students: The Schoolwide Applications Model (SAM). Presentation at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center and Human Development Center, New Orleans, LA. 

Stewart E, (2006) Weight Control - translating research into clinical practice. This is a discussion about the recent findings in weight management research (including research done in Stewart's lab) as well as providing some real-life, evidence-based strategies that clinicians can use in day-to-day practice. Sizzling Summer 2006: Improving Outcomes for your Patients." The conference is sponsored by Northwest Kansas Area Health Education Center, part of KUMC.

Rosales, M.V., & Storkel, H.L. (2006, June). Comparison of word learning by Spanish- and English-speaking toddlers: Effects of neighborhood density, word frequency, and word length. Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders, Madison, WI.

Stowe, M. (2006, April). Genetic research: What it means for persons with disabilities and their families. Paper presented at Environmental and Genetic Effects on Disability, Kansas Chapter of the American Association on Mental Retardation, Lawrence, KS.

Stowe, M. (2006, May). LRE and due process: Implications of IDEA as related to preschool age children and their families. Seminar for State Education Resource Center, Middletown, CT.

Summers, J., Gotto, G., & Zuna, NEffective administration for effective practice: Identifying administrative structures that are related to implementing best practices.

Summers, J., Zuna, N., Patrick, R., & Stuber, G. No familyleft behind: Relationships of preschool experiences to school readiness and family quality of life.

Turnbull, A., &  Poston, D. What do we really mean by self-determination or individual control of funding? The results of a national discussion on the defining characteristics of individual/family control of family.

Turnbull, A., Poston, D., Blue-Banning, M., & Wallace, L. What does it mean to really have choice and control over our own Medicaid HCBS funds?

Zuna, N. Social role valorization: Implications for and application to self-determination, school inclusion, and community integration.

Publications

Agran, M., & Wehmeyer, M. (2006). Child self-regulation.  In M. Hersen (Ed.), Clinician’s Handbook of Child Behavioral Assessment (pp. 181-199).  Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum and Associates

Lee, S., Palmer, S., Turnbull, A., & Wehmeyer, M. (2006). A model for parent-teacher collaboration to promote self-determination in young children with disabilities. Teaching Exceptional Children, 38(3), 36-41.

Stock, S., Davies, D.K., & Wehmeyer, M.L. (2006).  Evaluation of an application for making palmtop computers accessible to individuals with intellectual disabilities.  Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 31, 39-46.

Stowe, M., Turnbull, R., & Sublet, C. (2006) The Supreme Court, “Our Town,” and disability policy: Boardrooms and bedrooms, courtrooms and cloakrooms. Mental Retardation, 44, (2), 83-99.

Turnbull, H. R. (2005).  Individuals with Disabilities Education Act reauthorization: Accountability and personal responsibility.  Remedial and Special Education, 26(6), 320-326.

Turnbull, H.R. (2005). Theological, personal, and universal: Responses to Iozzio, M.J. The writing on the wall: Alzheimer’s disease. Journal of Disability, Religion and Health, 9(6), 75-78.

Turnbull, H.R. (2005). What should we do for Jay? The edges of life and cognitive disability. Journal of Religion, Disability, and Health, 9(2), 1-26. 

Turnbull, H.R. (2006). The legacy of our journey. TASH Connections, Jan./Feb., 40-41.

Wehmeyer, M.L. (2006).  L’autodeterminazione:  Il nuovo paradigma per la disabilita`. [Self-determination:  The new paradigm for the disability movement].  Giornale Italiano delle Disabilità [Italian Journal on Disability], 6(1), 3-13.. 

Wehmeyer, M.L. (2006).  Self-determination and individuals with severe disabilities:  Reexamining meanings and misinterpretations.  Research and Practice in Severe Disabilities, 30, 113-120.  

Wehmeyer, M., & Agran, M. (2006).  Promoting access to the general curriculum for students with significant cognitive disabilities.  In D. Browder & F. Spooner (Eds.), Teaching language arts, math, and science to students with significant cognitive disabilities (pp. 15-37).  Baltimore:  Paul H. Brookes.  

Wehmeyer, M.L., & Smith, J.D. (2006).  Leaving the garden:  Henry Herbert Goddard’s exodus from the Vineland Training School.  Mental Retardation, 44, 150-155.