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July / August 2004

Reminder: Annual LSI Investigators and Staff Meeting-September 15 from 3:30 to 5:00 in 2092 Dole Human Development Center.

News for the investigators, staff and associates of the

The Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies

LSI Lifeline Online July-August 2004 Issue 78

Editor, Karen Henry kahenry@ku.edu

The Life Span Institute at the University of Kansas

1052 Dole Human Development Center

1000 Sunnyside Avenue

Lawrence, KS 66045-7555 (785) 864-4295 TDD (785) 864-5051

Back issues of Lifeline

Submit your presentations: A calendar and archive of seminars, presentations, posters and training by and of interest to Life Span investigators begin at http://www2.ku.edu/~lsi/news/index.shtml. Send your submissions to jessica@ku.edu.

Contents

Lise Fox, early intervention researcher, leads off 2004-05 KU Colloquia on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities September 10

Eden Alternative founder Dr. Bill Thomas to speak October 6 at Dole Institute of Politics

KU Department of Human Development and Family Life is now the Department of Applied Behavioral Science reflecting changes in program and focus

Merrill Center retreat prompts discussions of regional research initiative

Expert on functional brain imaging featured on Merrill Center web site

Steve Mills, Director of Media Services, leaving for Oklahoma position

In Memoriam: Richard E. Tessel

KU airplane available for Washington, D.C. research sponsor trips

Life Span in the News

A new study that showed that infants whose mothers have higher levels of an essential omega-3 fatty acid show more advanced cognitive development directed by John Colombo, Susan Carlson and Kathleen Kannass got wide attention by the media.

The researchers found that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which affects brain and eye development, is derived by fetuses from their mothers and accumulates in the brain primarily in the third trimester.

They measured the DHA levels of 70 mothers' blood when their infants were born and then followed the infants for the first two years of their lives, evaluating them on different tests of attention during the first and second years.

Colombo is the Life Span’s associate director for cognitive neuroscience; Carlson, professor of nutrition at the KU Medical Center, and Kathleen Kannass, research associate at the Life Span Institute, now an assistant professor of psychology at Loyola University.

The study was featured on:
WebMD.com at http://my.webmd.com/content/Article/90/100860.htm
Forbes Online at http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2004/07/16/hscout520107.html;
DrKoop.com at http://www.drkoop.com/template.asp?page=newsdetail&ap=93&id=520107
PersonalMD.com at http://www.personalmd.com/news.jsp?nid=520107
HealthScout.com at http://www.personalmd.com/news.jsp?nid=520107
Lawrence Journal World at http://www.ljworld.com/section/citynews/story/176205

Lise Fox, early intervention specialist, leads off 2004-05 KU Colloquia on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities September 10

Lise Fox, Ph.D., an authority on early intervention, will lead off the 2004-05 KU Colloquia on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities on Friday, September 10 at 2:30 in 2092 Dole Human Development Center. Dr Fox is the co-director of the University of South Florida Center for Autism and Related Disabilities, is a professor in the Department of Child and Family Studies of the Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute of the University of South Florida. Dr. Fox is the director of an early intervention model demonstration and outreach program, the Individualized Support Project, which supports young children with autism and serious problem behavior, and their families. She also serves as an administrative team member of the Center for Autism and Related Disabilities.

The series continues this fall with Frank Symons, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, whose interests include the environmental and pharmacological mechanisms underlying self-injury by children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Thursday, October 21, 4 p.m. Location TBD.

In the spring, the series will feature Jim Bodfish, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, who focuses on the integration of behavioral and medication therapies for the treatment of severe behavior disorders (e.g. stereotypies, rituals, self-injury, aggression, overactivity); Brian Iwata, Ph.D., University of Florida, who specializes in the functional analysis of severe behavior disorders; and Rob Horner, Ph.D., University of Oregon, who has 25-year history of research on school reform and positive behavior support include helping schools and school administrators develop systems for embedding school-wide systems of positive behavior support.

The specific dates, times and locations for these will be announced later. Contact Karen Henry, kahenry@ku.edu for more information.

KU Colloquia on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities is sponsored by several life sciences research centers on the Lawrence and KUMC campuses: the Life Span Institute, the Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Center, the Center for Reproductive Sciences, the Beach Center on Disability, the Juniper Gardens Children’s Project and the Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities.

The 2004-05 Colloquia on Positive Behavior Interventions, is chaired by Dr. Rachel Freeman.

Eden Alternative founder Dr. Bill Thomas to speak October 6 at Dole Institute of Politics

Bill Thomas, M.D., geriatrician, reformer and founder of The Eden Alternative, will speak on Wednesday, October 6, 2004, 7 p.m. at the Dole Institute of Politics on the Lawrence campus. His talk is titled, What Are Old People For? A Radical Reinterpretation of Aging and the Elderly in American Society, echoing the theme of his new book by the same name.

Winner of the America's Award (established by Norman Vincent Peale and sometimes called "The Nobel Prize for Goodness"), the Molly Mettler Award from the Health Promotion Institute, and an award from the Giraffe Project (for sticking his neck out), Bill Thomas is a Harvard-educated medical doctor with a special concern for the elderly. Most recently, he has received a three-year fellowship from Ashoka for his social entrepreneurship work with Eden and improving the lives of elders. Ashoka is a global nonprofit organization that searches the world for social entrepreneurs—extraordinary individuals with unprecedented ideas for change in their communities.

The Eden Alternative, which Thomas developed in 1991, urged major reforms in how frail elders are cared for in the U.S. Thomas’ new book promotes the concept of Green Houses—small communities where older people live together intentionally and meaningfully.

Dr. Thomas is sponsored by the Life Span Institute, the Gerontology Center, School of Social Welfare Office of Aging and Long-Term Care with the Kansas Association of Homes and Services for the Aging.

The presentation, which is free and open to the public, will be followed by a book signing and reception.

Contact Karen Henry at kahenry@ku.edu or Debbie McAftery at mcaftery@ku.edu for more information.

KU Department of Human Development and Family Life is now the Department of Applied Behavioral Science reflecting changes in program and focus

On August 1, 2004, the Department of Human Development and Family Life at the University of Kansas officially became The University of Kansas Department of Applied Behavioral Science. To maintain the department’s historical continuity and recognition within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, university, and greater academic community, the department has added a program name—The KU Program in Human Development and Family Life.

The department has redefined its mission, reorganized its curriculum, and revised its undergraduate and graduate program requirements. These changes reflect refinements in the department’s scientific and disciplinary identity and focus; recent advances in applied behavioral science (e.g., behavior analysis); areas of sustained growth and professional development, and new career, graduate school, and professional opportunities for students in the application of the science of behavior to problems of individual, social, and cultural importance.

New undergraduate majors will be required to complete 33 hours in four required courses—an increase of three hours over former requirements—and complete additional coursework and a practicum in a specialty area that applies behavioral science to societal problems.

The two-track doctoral program has been replaced by one integrated track, requiring minor adjustments to requirements in that area. The doctoral degree’s name has been changed from “developmental and child psychology” to “behavioral psychology.”

Changes are effective this fall for newly enrolling undergraduate and graduate students. Current students may remain in the HDFL major and graduate degree programs or they may elect to change to the ABS programs.

For more information, contact Edward K. Morris, chair and professor at ekm@ku.edu or visit: http://www.ku.edu/~absc/.

Merrill Center Retreat prompts discussions of regional research initiative

The Merrill Advanced Studies Center held the 8th annual retreat in its series, The Research Mission of Public Universities, on July 21-23. Twenty senior administrators and faculty attended from the four heartland states – Kansas, Missouri, Iowa and Nebraska. The keynote speaker, Mary Sue Coleman, president of the University of Michigan, talked about Michigan’s success in attracting major investments for research facilities. Participants talked about launching a new regional initiative that could significantly advance the research funding potential for each institution in the four-state partnership. Three other chancellors attended: Bob Hemenway (KU), Harvey Perlman (Nebraska), and Jon Wefald (K-State), as well as Dave Shulenburger (Provost – KU). Keith Yehle, Legislative Director for Senator Pat Roberts, is also a regular participant. A conference photo gallery is available online: http://www.merrill.ku.edu/conferences/2004policy.html.

Joy Simpson, Program Administrator
Merrill Advanced Studies Center

Expert on functional brain imaging featured on Merrill Center web site

Guinevere Eden, director of the Center for the Study of Learning at Georgetown University, Medical Center explains the emerging research applications of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or fMRI, a safe, relatively new way of looking at brain activity, in Brain Imaging: What does it tell us about reading? on the Merrill Advanced Studies Center In the Know web site at http://www.merrill.ku.edu/IntheKnow/sciencearticles/Eden%20interview.html.

Eden’s interview is the latest in a series of features that are aimed at explaining trends in science to the general public, written and edited by the Merrill Center’s Joy Simpson.

In the Know explains hot topics in science and science policy as they emerge at Merrill conferences and taps into the wealth of knowledge at the Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies. The site features articles and fact sheets for the general reader that gives accurate information about disabilities, aging, and human development.

Steve Mills, Director of Media Services, leaving for Oklahoma position

Steve Mills, director of the Media Laboratory at the Parsons site of the LSI, has accepted a new position as the director/CEO of the University and College Center of Ardmore, Oklahoma. Known as the Ardmore Higher Education Center, the program delivers classes from East Central University, Murray State College (a community college), Southeastern Oklahoma State University, and Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City. Freshman through graduate classes are taught and students can earn an associate, bachelor, or master’s degree through one of the four participating institutions. Steve has been with the Parsons program for approximately six years, provided leadership for Media, developed grant projects focusing on captioning of news services and instructional and service program evaluation. We wish him good luck in his new position.

David P. Lindeman, Ph.D.
Director, LSI/Parsons

In Memoriam: Richard E. Tessel

Rick Tessel, colleague, friend, and research scientist of Life Span Institute for 12 years, died July 18, 2004 at Lawrence Memorial Hospital of congestive heart failure following a bout of pneumonia. His young age, only 60, reminds us all of the uncertainty of our life span on this earth. Rick was a controversial character at KU, a true eccentric. Sometimes funny, sometimes brilliant, sometimes bombastic, sometimes downright infuriating, he fought for what he believed in: excellent science, making his life count for something, trying to help people, being a father to his children. He lived life in overdrive and had an independent intellect that pursued an idea like a bloodhound on a trail in full cry. He read voraciously and often came into my office with the latest paper from Science or Nature on training-induced recovery from brain damage or on other work we were doing. He had a stroke himself in about 1995, which seemed to drive him harder in his research. He seemed to know that his time was limited. His colleagues and students who loved him will miss him.

Steve Schroeder, Professor Emeritus
Director, Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies, 1991-2001

KU Airplane available for Washington, D.C. research sponsor trips

Chancellor Hemenway is making the KU airplane available to fly KU researchers to Washington, D.C., to visit with potential research sponsors on these dates: September 30, November 3, February 15, March 15, and April 7. Seats are limited and on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, contact the KU Center for Research at 864-7336 or dctrips@kucr.ku.edu.

Institute Activities

Honors

Mary Abbott will receive the Dollar General’s ProLiteracy National Tutor of the Year award at the annual Pro-Literacy Worldwide conference in October. The purpose of the award is to honor an individual who has rendered outstanding tutoring services to an adult student through the ProLiteracy America/Dollar General Student Referral Project.

Susan Kemper was presented with the Master Mentor award by the Retirement Research Foundation and Div. 20 (Adult Development and Aging) of the American Psychological Association. The Master Mentor Award is presented to an established figure in the field of adult development and aging who has had a significant impact on the development of the careers of students and junior colleagues in the psychology of adult development and aging.

Publications

Brady, N., Marquis, J., Fleming, K., & McLean, L. (2004). Prelinguistic predictors of language outcomes in children with developmental disabilities. Journal of Speech Language Hearing Research, 47 (3), 663-677.

Halle, J., Brady, N., & Drasgow, E. (2004). Enhancing Socially Adaptive Communicative Repairs of Beginning Communicators with Disabilities, American Journal of Speech Language Pathology, 13 (1) 43-55

Skrtic, T., Sailor, W., & Gee, K. (in press). Voice, collaboration, and inclusion: democratic themes in educational and social reform initiatives. In. D. Mitchell (ed.) Systems and Contexts vol. 1. London, New York: Routledge Falmer.

Presentations

Cress, P. (July, 2004). Accessible Information Technology in Education: Problems and Solutions. Presentation at the Mid-America Technology Institute Conference, Overland Park, KS.

Cress, P. (July, 2004). Universal Design for Web Content. Presentation at the Mid-America Technology Institute Conference, Overland Park, KS.

Sailor, W. (2004, July). Contextualizing Schoolwide PBS and Inclusive Education. OSEP Director's Meeting, Washington, DC.

Brady, N. (2004, July). Facilitating communication development in nonspeaking children with developmental disabilities. Presented to summer course, Teaching children with learning difficulties, at University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.

Kemper, S. (2004). Floors and Ceilings in the Study of Language Production by Older Adults. International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, Gent, Belgium.

Kemper, S., McDowd, J., & Metcalf, K. (2004). Aging and Distractibility during Reading. International Congress of Psychology, Beijing, China.

Warren, S.F. (2004, July). Treatment Efficacy as a Standard for Newborn Screening of Disorders Associated with Intellectual Disabilities. National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Conference, Washington, DC.

Lollar, D., Turk, M., Graham, C.L., Ravesloot, C., Kinne, S., McDermott, S., Platt, T., & Nary. D. (2004, July). The Prevention of Secondary Conditions in People with Disabilities: What Have We Learned in Ten Years. National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Conference, Washington, DC.

Seekins, T., Ravesloot, C., Nary, D.E., Lindgren, S., & Cahill, A.G. (2004, July). Living Well with a Disability: Development, Implementation and Evaluation of a Nationally Recognized Health Promotion Intervention for Adults with Disabilities. National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Conference, Washington, DC.

Central Office News

Central Office News and Announcements

Project Development

Paul Diedrich, Associate Director for Project Development

Past Submissions not Previously Reported

1. Michael Wehmeyer submitted his second-year, grant performance report “Beyond High School: Replicating a Multistage Model Infusing Self-Determination into 18-21 Services” to DE/OSERS/OSEP on July 1, 2004.

2. Wayne Sailor and Amy McCart submitted a new, three-year subcontract proposal “Comprehensive Systematic Reform Through Community-School Partnerships Promoting Safe, Disciplined, Drug Free Environments for Students in Kansas City, Kansas” via the Kansas City Kansas School District, prime contractor, to HHS/DOJ for their Safe Schools/Healthy Student Initiative on July 9, 2004.

Seven proposals were submitted to the three different components of the DE/OSERS/OSEP competition “Research and Innovation to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities” on July 9, 2004:

a. Innovation Research

3. Mary Abbott’s four-year proposal “Grouping Size Efficacy Study of the LAMP (Language Arts Multisensory Program): An Investigation of the Learning of Students “Unresponsive” to Most Forms of Literacy Instruction”;

4. Pamela Cress, Kathryn Saunders and Charles Spellman’s three-year proposal “Programmed Instruction to Teach the Braille Alphabet”; and

5. Howard Wills, Debra Kamps and Charles Greenwood’s five-year proposal “Secondary and Tertiary Level Intervention in School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Systems: Experimental Studies in Research to Practice”.

b. Model Development

6. Susan Palmer, Eva Horn and Barbara Thompson’s three-year proposal “Building an Evidence-Based Early Childhood Model for Curriculum Access through University Design for Learning (BEEM)”;

7. Wayne Sailor and Amy McCart’s three-year proposal “Effects of a Fully Integrated Educational Service Delivery Model on Academic and Social Outcomes for Students With and Without Disabilities”; and

8. Dale Walker’s and Charles Greenwood’s three-year proposal “Developing and Testing a Model for the Use of Meaningful Outcome Measures for Infants and Toddlers”.

c. Replication and Scale-Up

9. Michael Wehmeyer, Susan Palmer and Susan Bashinski’s three-year proposal “The Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction: Promoting Self-Directed Learning and Access to and Progress in the General Curriculum for Students with Cognitive Disabilities”.

10. Glen White and James Budde submitted their fifth-year, grant performance report for the “Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Full Participation in Independent Living” to DE/OSERS/NIDRR on July 15, 2004.

11. Joseph Donnelly, Bryan Smith, Rik Washburn, Cheryl Gibson, Matthew Mayo and Debra Sullivan submitted their five-year, competing renewal “Long-Term Exercise, Weight Loss and Energy Balance” to NIDDK on July 15, 2004.

12. Joseph Donnelly submitted a new, five-year proposal “Kansas Diabetes Prevention Program” via the Haskell Health Center to HHS/Indian Health Service for their Special Diabetes Program for Indians Competitive Grant Program on July 15, 2004.

13. Joseph Donnelly submitted a new, 16-month proposal “Effects of Carbohydrate Blockers on Weight Management” to the National Enzyme Company on July 16, 2004.

14. Martha Hodgesmith submitted a new, five-year subcontract proposal “Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Employment Service Systems” via University of Massachusetts-Boston, prime contractor, to DE/OSERS/NIDRR on July 23, 2004.

15. Judith Carta and Dale Walker submitted a new, one-year proposal “Kansas Partnership to Develop Part C State Outcome Indicators” to KDHE on July 23, 2004.

16. Jane Atwater submitted a new, three-year subcontract proposal “Midwest Child Care Consortium II: Quality Rating Systems ands Professional Development for Child Care Providers” via the University of Nebraska @ Lincoln to HHS on July 26, 2004.

17. Michael Wehmeyer submitted a new, five-year subcontract proposal “Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Cognitive Disabilities” via the University of Colorado to DE/OSERS/NIDRR on July 27, 2004.

18. Joseph Donnelly, Bryan Smith, Richard Washburn and Debra Sullivan submitted a revised, one-year, contract proposal “Growth Hormone Use in Prader-Willi Syndrome and Obese Adults” to Children’s Mercy Hospital, prime contractor to Genentech, Inc. on July 27, 2004

19. Steven Warren and Judith Carta submitted a new, one-year subcontract proposal “Baby/Child Library” to Georgetown University, prime contractor, to Reading is Fundamental, Inc. on July 28, 2004.

20. Diane Loeb submitted her third-year, grant performance report “Project CIRCLE 2: Creating Indian Resources to Facilitate Communication Skills” to DE/OIE on July 28, 2004.

21. Glen White submitted a new, one-year subcontract proposal “Developing an Action Plan to Improve the Quality and Quantity of Data about Paralysis” in collaboration with Michael Fox (PI @ KU Medical Center) to the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation on July 30, 2004.

22. Glen White submitted a new, five year subcontract proposal “Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Health and Wellness for Persons with Long-Term Disabilities” via the Oregon Health and Sciences University, prime contractor, to DE/OSERS/NIDRR on August 3, 20004.

23. Mabel Rice and Stacy Betz resubmitted their two-year, predoctoral fellowship proposal “Language based ERPs in Children with and without SLI” to NIDCD on August 5, 2004.

24. Joseph Donnelly and Bryan Smith submitted a new, one-year proposal “Behavioral Factors for Low Carbohydrate versus Low Fat Diets for Weight Maintenance Subsequent to Weight Loss” to the Atkins Foundation on August 6, 2004.

25. H.R. Turnbull and Ann Turnbull submitted their second-year, grant performance report “Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Policies Affecting Families of Children with Disabilities (Beach IV)” to DE/OSERS/NIDRR on August 13, 2004.

26. Ric Steele and Ann McGrath-Davis (KUMC) submitted a new, four-year proposal “Effectiveness of a Treatment for Pediatric Obesity” to HHS/HRSA on August 15, 2004.

27. Sara Sack and Charles Spellman submitted their twelfth-year, grant performance report “Assistive Technology for Kansans Project (ATKP)” on August 16, 2004.

28. Joseph Donnelly, Debra Sullivan and Bryan Smith submitted a one-year, supplemental proposal “Serum Lipid Response to Alterations in Dietary Fat in Carbohydrate Restricted Diets” to the Robert C. Atkins Foundation on August 16, 2004.

29. Kathleen Olson submitted a new, one-year proposal “Kansans Mobilizing for Direct Support Workforce Change” to the Kansas SRS on August 18, 2004.

30. Michael Wehmeyer, Jennifer Lattimore and Wendy Parent submitted a new, five-year proposal “Mentoring to Promote Self-Determined Career and Employment Outcomes for Youth and Young Adults with Disabilities” to DE/OSERS/RSA for their Special Demonstration Programs – Model Transitional Rehabilitation Services for Youth and Young Adults with Disabilities competition on August 19, 2004.

31. Glen White submitted a new, one-year proposal “Comprehensive Training for Personnel of Hospitals, Public Health, Emergency Preparedness and Emergency Response Agencies in Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Response for Persons with Disabilities” to the KDHE on August 24, 2004.

Three proposals were submitted to the DE/OSERS/OSEP competition “Research Innovation to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities – Reading Interventions for Students with Mental Retardation” on August 30, 2004:

32. Mary Abbott, Linda Heitzman-Powell and Jay Buzhardt, in collaboration with Peter Dowrick and Joann Yuen at the University of Hawaii, Manoa, submitted a new, five-year proposal “An Experimental Study of the Efficacy of the LAMP (Language Arts Multisensory Program) for Elementary School Students with Mild to Moderate Mental Retardation”;

33. Kathryn Saunders and Dean Williams, in collaboration with Bill McIlvane and Harry Mackay at the University of Massachusetts Medical School – Shriver Center, submitted a new, five-year proposal “Establishing Reading Skills in Students with Moderate-to-Severe Mental Retardation”; and

34. Michael Wehmeyer and Sean Smith submitted a new, five-year subcontract proposal “Universal Design for Literacy Learning” via the Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST), Inc.

New Awards (not previously funded) Information

1. Susan Kemper received a new, two-year award “Tracking Older Adults’ Eye Movements While Reading” from the KU Medical Center, prime contractor to NIA, which began September 1, 2003.

2. Tiffany Hogan (Hugh Catts and Holly Storkel – faculty sponsors) received a new, two-year predoctoral fellowship “Lexical Representations and Phonological Awareness” from NIDCD that began January 1, 2004.

3. Erik Kirk (Richard Washburn – faculty sponsor) received a new, two-year predoctoral fellowship “Effects of 24 Weeks of Supervised Resistance Training on 24 Hour Energy Expenditure and Metabolic Risk Factors in Overweight Young Adults” from the American Heart Association that began January 1, 2004.

4. Bruce Bailey (Joseph Donnelly – faculty sponsor) received a new, two-year predoctoral fellowship “The Effects of Dietary Calcium and Dairy Consumption on Metabolic Risk Factors” from the American Heart Association that began January 1, 2004.

5. Todd Little received a new, two year award “Emerging Language and Literacy Project (ELL Project)” from the Children’s Therapeutic Learning Center that began January 1, 2004.

6. Stephen Fowler received a new, one-year award “Synuclein Aggregation, Crosslinking and Centrosomes” from the KU Medical Center, prime contractor to NIH, which began February 1, 2004.

7. Michael Vitevitch received a new, five-year award “Processing Neighbors in Speech Perception and Production” from NIDCD that began July 1, 2004.

8. Joseph Donnelly received a new, one-year award “Conference on the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity” from NIDDK that began August 1, 2004.

9. Mary Abbott received a new, one-year award “Capacity Building: Preventing the Life Long Effects of Illiteracy” from the Ewing M. Kauffman Fund that began August 1, 2004.

In addition, we are in the process of contract negotiations on half-a-dozen new projects and are waiting on several other new awards. We hope to report on these projects next month.

Comments and questions to: lifespan@ku.edu


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