Presentations

Presentations

Karen Salisbury Henry

Vicki Collie-Akers, associate director of Health Promotion Research for the KU Work Group for Community Health and Development, served as guest facilitator for “the Big Share,” an event hosted at KU-Lawrence by the Center for Civic and Social Responsibility.  Collie-Akers discussed her experiences with the Work Group and guided a conversation on community-based participatory research. 
 
Vincent Francisco, co-director of the KU Work Group on Community Health and Development,  was the presenter at a live, interactive webinar on April 25 hosted by Behaviorists for Social Responsibility. “Wicked Solutions for Wicked Problems: Behavior Analysis and Public Health” advocated for applied behavior research in the field of public health and health promotion. “Wicked problems” refers to those that seem to defy solutions. The BFSR is a special interest group of the Association for Behavioral Analysis: International, which encourages the application of behavior analysis and behavioral systems analysis to address social issues.

Francisco also served as keynote speaker for the Prevention Awards of Excellence luncheon held March 29 in Topeka by the Kansas Family Partnership, Inc. It was the 20th anniversary of the organization, which recognizes prevention efforts in substance abuse, drug abuse and other public health concerns and achievements from across the state.
 
Christina Holt, associate director for Community Tool Box Services at the KU Work Group for Community Health and Development, presented to National Democratic Institute staff in Washington, D.C. on May 31. The KU Work Group is partnering with NDI with Community Tool Box resources to build capacity among youth change-makers. The NDI is chaired by Madeleine Albright who founded the nonprofit, nonpartisan organization in 1983.

Holt also was invited to host an exhibit at the World Bank Group’s 2016 Global Leadership Forum in Washington, D.C. to share the Community Tool Box's capacity-building resources with attendees from around the world.

Other Presentations
Fawcett S., Collie-Akers V., & Schultz J.Community policies and programs for prevention of childhood obesity. (2016, April). Paper presentation at Society of Behavioral Medicine Annual Meeting, April 2, 2016; Washington, DC.
 
Horn, E., & Palmer, S. (2016, February).Children’s school success: A framework for inclusive early education. Preconference workshop presented at the 34th Annual Kansas Division for Early Childhood Conference: Building Real Relationships with Professionals and Families Using Evidence Based Practices, Wichita, KS.
 
Johnston, K., Helfer, M., & Kemp, P. (2016, February). Parent-early start Denver model and the primary service provider approach/coaching with parents (Part 1). Paper presented at the 34th Annual Kansas Division for Early Childhood Conference: Building Real Relationships with Professionals and Families Using Evidence Based Practices, Wichita, KS.
 
Lindeman, D.P., & Rinkel, P. (2016, April). Individualized intensive behavior support in preschool: An online community of practice approach. Poster presented at the 2016 Council for Exceptional Children Convention and Expo, St Louis, MO.
 
Lindeman, D. P., & Rinkel, P. (2016, February).Revitalizing your commitment to inclusion. Paper presented at the 34th Annual Kansas Division for Early Childhood Conference: Building Real Relationships with Professionals and Families Using Evidence Based Practices, Wichita, KS.
 
Lindeman, D. P., Rinkel, P., Heintz, C., & Mitchell, L. (2016, February). Kansas early learning standards: Training modules and supporting resources. Paper presented at the 34th Annual Kansas Division for Early Childhood Conference: Building Real Relationships with Professionals and Families Using Evidence Based Practices, Wichita, KS.
 
Sack, S., Edmonds, C., Myers, J. L., & Black-Magnussen, J. (2016, February). Indirect Cost [Teleconference]. Arlington, VA: RESNA Catalyst Project.
 
Sack, S., & Simmons, S. (2016, March). Assistive Technology for Kansans (ATK) services [Teleconference]. Topeka, KS: Ombudsman Lunch & Learn Series, KanCare.
  
Schultz J. (2016, March). Using performance monitoring and baseline data to improve your program and evaluation. CDC REACH Technical Assistance webinar.

Shogren, K. A. & Wehmeyer, M. L. (2016, April). Self-determination and MTSS. Paper presentation in the Response to Intervention (RtI): Multi-Tiered System of Supports Strand at the 2016 Council for Exceptional Children Convention and Expo, St. Louis, MO.
 
Walters, S., & Kemp, P. (2016, February).Unleashing the new DEC recommended practices. Paper presented at the 34th Annual Kansas Division for Early Childhood Conference: Building Real Relationships with Professionals and Families Using Evidence Based Practices, Wichita, KS.
 
Publications
 
Seo, H., Little, T. D., Shogren, K. A., & Lang, K. M. (2016). On the benefits of latent variable modeling for norming scales: The case of the Supports Intensity Scale – Children’s Version.International Journal of Behavioral Development, 40, 373-384. doi:10.1177/0165025415591230
 
Shogren, K. A. (2016). Self-determination and self-advocacy. In Critical Issues in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Contemporary Research, Practice, and Policy (p. 1-18). Washington, DC: American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.
 
Shogren, K. A., Garnier-Villarreal, M., Dowsett, C., & Little, T. D. (2016). Exploring student, family, and school predictors of self-determination using NLTS2 data. Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals, 39, 23-33. doi: 10.1177/2165143414546685
 
Shogren, K. A, Seo, H., Wehmeyer, M. L., Thompson, J. R., & Little, T. D. (2016). Impact of Protection and Advocacy Subscale on the factorial validity of the Supports Intensity Scale – Adult Version. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 121, 48-64. doi:10.1352/1944-7558-121.1.48
 
Shogren, K. A. & Shaw, L. A. (2016). The role of autonomy, self-realization, and psychological empowerment in predicting early adulthood outcomes for youth with disabilities. Remedial and Special Education, 37, 55-62. doi:10.1177/0741932515585003